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I'm using John Resig's simple javascript inheritance code to build and extend classes. I have some classes like his examples:

var Person = Class.extend({
  init: function(isDancing){
    this.dancing = isDancing;
  },
  dance: function(){
    return this.dancing;
  }
});

var Ninja = Person.extend({
  init: function(){
    this._super( false );
  },
  dance: function(){
    // Call the inherited version of dance()
    return this._super();
  },
  swingSword: function(){
    return true;
  }
});

I want a function that I can pass a variable and it will return true if the variable is a class that inherits from Person, or false if it's not.

By "inherits from Person" I mean that it was created by calling the .extend() function of Person, or of a class that inherits from Person.

If I have an instance of the class, I can use instanceof to determine if the class inherited from Person. Is there any way to do this without creating an instance?

Thanks!

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his extend actually just copies properties, no inheritance involved. i fear your task is impossible except with static analysts or some type of expensive reflection sniffing. –  dandavis Feb 6 at 22:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can simply use the instanceof operator with the classes' prototype:

function isPersonSubclass(cls) {
    return typeof cls == "function" && cls.prototype instanceof Person;
}

isPersonSubclass(Ninja) // true
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Looking at the code, it looks like the prototype object is set to an instance of the parent "class":

// Instantiate a base class (but only create the instance,
// don't run the init constructor)
var prototype = new this();

// [...]

Class.prototype = prototype;

So you could do:

Ninja.prototype instanceof Person

DEMO

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