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Simple question, I have an element which I am grabbing via .getElementById (). How do I check if it has any children?

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up vote 77 down vote accepted

A couple of ways:

if (element.firstChild) {
    // It has at least one
}

or the hasChildNodes() function:

if (element.hasChildNodes()) {
    // It has at least one
}

or the length property of childNodes:

if (element.childNodes.length > 0) { // Or just `if (element.childNodes.length)`
    // It has at least one
}

If you only want to know about child elements (as opposed to text nodes, attribute nodes, etc.) on all modern browsers (and IE8 — in fact, even IE6) you can do this: (thank you Florian!)

if (element.children.length > 0) { // Or just `if (element.children.length)`
    // It has at least one element as a child
}

That relies on the children property, which wasn't defined in DOM1, DOM2, or DOM3, but which has near-universal support. (It works in IE6 and up and Chrome, Firefox, and Opera at least as far back as November 2012, when this was originally written.) If supporting older mobile devices, be sure to check for support.

If you don't need IE8 and earlier support, you can also do this:

if (element.firstElementChild) {
    // It has at least one element as a child
}

That relies on firstElementChild. Like children, it wasn't defined in DOM1-3 either, but unlike children it wasn't added to IE until IE9.

If you want to stick to something defined in DOM1 (maybe you have to support really obscure browsers), you have to do more work:

var hasChildElements, child;
hasChildElements = false;
for (child = element.firstChild; child; child = child.nextSibling) {
    if (child.nodeType == 1) { // 1 == Element
        hasChildElements = true;
        break;
    }
}

All of that is part of DOM1, and nearly universally supported.

It would be easy to wrap this up in a function, e.g.:

function hasChildElement(elm) {
    var child, rv;

    if (elm.children) {
        // Supports `children`
        rv = elm.children.length !== 0;
    } else {
        // The hard way...
        rv = false;
        for (child = element.firstChild; !rv && child; child = child.nextSibling) {
            if (child.nodeType == 1) { // 1 == Element
                rv = true;
            }
        }
    }
    return rv;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Oh, I didn't realize children was only added in DOM4. Knowing it was supported in any known browser, I thought this was pretty much DOM0/1. – Florian Margaine Nov 9 '12 at 12:29
    
how do i check if any div has element div having specific class say xyz ? – Pooja Desai Feb 20 '13 at 11:04
    
firstChild and hasChildNodes return any node, not only children (nodeType==1). You should correct that. ;-) – Adrian Maire Sep 30 '13 at 11:19
1  
Never seen a loop condition like for (child = element.firstChild; child; child = child.nextSibling ), voted. Thanks T.J. – NiCk Newman Jul 9 '15 at 0:40
1  
@Aaron: It's entirely possible for element.firstChild to be non-null when element.children.length is 0: firstChild and such relate to nodes including elements, text nodes, comment notes, etc.; children is purely a list of element children. On modern browsers you can use firstElementChild instead. – T.J. Crowder Aug 18 '15 at 6:01

You can check if the element has child nodes element.hasChildNodes(). Beware in Mozilla this will return true if the is whitespace after the tag so you will need to verify the tag type.

https://developer.mozilla.org/En/DOM/Node.hasChildNodes

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5  
Not just in Mozilla. This is correct behaviour; it's IE that gets it wrong. – bobince Jan 29 '10 at 12:35

As slashnick & bobince mention, hasChildNodes() will return true for whitespace (text nodes). However, I didn't want this behaviour, and this worked for me :)

element.getElementsByTagName('*').length > 0

Edit: for the same functionality, this is a better solution:

 element.children.length > 0

children[] is a subset of childNodes[], containing elements only.

Compatibility

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Oh yeah I forgot to mention the overhead it involves o.O but it worked! – c24w Nov 9 '12 at 10:45

Late but document fragment could be a node:

function hasChild(el){
    var child = el && el.firstChild;
    while (child) {
        if (child.nodeType === 1 || child.nodeType === 11) {
            return true;
        }
        child = child.nextSibling;
    }
    return false;
}
// or
function hasChild(el){
    for (var i = 0; el && el.childNodes[i]; i++) {
        if (el.childNodes[i].nodeType === 1 || el.childNodes[i].nodeType === 11) {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

See: https://github.com/qeremy/mii/blob/master/mii.dom.js#L733

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You could also do the following:

if (element.innerHTML.trim() !== '') {
    // It has at least one
} 

This uses the trim() method to treat empty elements which have only whitespaces (in which case hasChildNodes returns true) as being empty.

JSBin Demo

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<script type="text/javascript">

function uwtPBSTree_NodeChecked(treeId, nodeId, bChecked) 
{
    //debugger;
    var selectedNode = igtree_getNodeById(nodeId);
    var ParentNodes = selectedNode.getChildNodes();

    var length = ParentNodes.length;

    if (bChecked) 
    {
/*                if (length != 0) {
                    for (i = 0; i < length; i++) {
                        ParentNodes[i].setChecked(true);
                    }
    }*/
    }
    else 
    {
        if (length != 0) 
        {
            for (i = 0; i < length; i++) 
            {
                ParentNodes[i].setChecked(false);
            }
        }
    }
}
</script>

<ignav:UltraWebTree ID="uwtPBSTree" runat="server"..........>
<ClientSideEvents NodeChecked="uwtPBSTree_NodeChecked"></ClientSideEvents>
</ignav:UltraWebTree>
share|improve this answer
    
Please don't just provide code-only solutions. Also, why have you commented-out code in there? – Lee Taylor Dec 9 '12 at 1:37
    
Downvote: This code is obscure, part of the code is unnecesary, there is not comments or explanation and it look like a copy/past. Also the XML part has nothing to do here. – Adrian Maire Sep 30 '13 at 11:23
    
What is this madness? – NiCk Newman Jul 9 '15 at 0:41

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