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I'm a python newbie, so please bear with me.

I need to find the frequency of elements in a list

a = [1,1,1,1,2,2,2,2,3,3,4,5,5]

output->

b = [4,4,2,1,2]

Also I want to remove the duplicates from a

a = [1,2,3,4,5]
share|improve this question
    
Are they always ordered like in that example? – Farinha Jan 29 '10 at 12:11
    
yes, I have sorted the list – Bruce Jan 29 '10 at 12:14
    
@Peter. Yes, you've sorted the list for the purposes of posting. Will the list always be sorted? – S.Lott Jan 29 '10 at 12:26
1  
No, the list will not be sorted always. This is not homework. – Bruce Jan 29 '10 at 12:54
    
I am trying to plot the graph of degree distribution of a network. – Bruce Jan 29 '10 at 12:55

12 Answers 12

up vote 45 down vote accepted

Since the list is ordered you can do this:

a = [1,1,1,1,2,2,2,2,3,3,4,5,5]
from itertools import groupby
[len(list(group)) for key, group in groupby(a)]

Output:

[4, 4, 2, 1, 2]
share|improve this answer
    
nice, using groupby. I wonder about its efficiency vs. the dict approach, though – Eli Bendersky Jan 29 '10 at 12:20
    
@Eli, yeah I'm not sure about its efficiency. But it doesn't hurt to have a variety of solutions. – Nadia Alramli Jan 29 '10 at 12:28
5  
The python groupby creates new groups when the value it sees changes. In this case 1,1,1,2,1,1,1] would return [3,1,3]. If you expected [6,1] then just be sure to sort the data before using groupby. – Evan Jan 30 '10 at 22:41
    
I wonder if there's a way to skip the conversion to a list in len(list(group)). – Cristian Ciupitu Mar 22 '10 at 12:17

In Python 2.7, you can use collections.Counter:

import collections
a = [1,1,1,1,2,2,2,2,3,3,4,5,5]
counter=collections.Counter(a)
print(counter)
# Counter({1: 4, 2: 4, 3: 2, 5: 2, 4: 1})
print(counter.values())
# [4, 4, 2, 1, 2]
print(counter.keys())
# [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
print(counter.most_common(3))
# [(1, 4), (2, 4), (3, 2)]

If you are using Python 2.6 or older, you can download it here.

share|improve this answer
    
@unutbu: What if I have three lists, a,b,c for which a and b remain the same, but c changes? How to count the the value of c for which a and c are same? – ThePredator Jun 29 '14 at 12:31
    
@Srivatsan: I don't understand the situation. Please post a new question where you can elaborate. – unutbu Jun 29 '14 at 13:27
    
Is there a way to extract the dictionary {1:4, 2:4, 3:2, 5:2, 4:1} from the counter object ? – Pavan Mar 22 '15 at 0:38
2  
@Pavan: collections.Counter is a subclass of dict. You can use it in the same way you would a normal dict. If you really want a dict, however, you could convert it to a dict using dict(counter). – unutbu Mar 22 '15 at 0:46

Python 2.7+ introduces Dictionary Comprehension. Building the dictionary from the list will get you the count as well as get rid of duplicates.

>>> a = [1,1,1,1,2,2,2,2,3,3,4,5,5]
>>> d = {x:a.count(x) for x in a}
>>> d
{1: 4, 2: 4, 3: 2, 4: 1, 5: 2}
>>> a, b = d.keys(), d.values()
>>> a
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
>>> b
[4, 4, 2, 1, 2]
share|improve this answer
    
This works really well with lists of strings as opposed to integers like the original question asked. – Glen Selle Jan 14 at 5:29
1  
It's faster using a set: {x:a.count(x) for x in set(a)} – stenci Feb 17 at 17:55

To count the number of appearances:

from collections import defaultdict

appearances = defaultdict(int)

for curr in a:
    appearances[curr] += 1

To remove duplicates:

a = set(a) 
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for collections.defaultdict. Also, in python 3.x, look up collections.Counter. It is the same as collections.defaultdict(int). – hughdbrown Jan 29 '10 at 13:54

Counting the frequency of elements is probably best done with a dictionary:

b = {}
for item in a:
    b[item] = b.get(item, 0) + 1

To remove the duplicates, use a set:

a = list(set(a))
share|improve this answer
7  
What's wrong with collections.defaultdict? – S.Lott Jan 29 '10 at 12:26
6  
@S.Lott: What's wrong with posting your answer? – phkahler Jan 29 '10 at 15:09
2  
@phkahler: Mine would only a tiny bit better than this. It's hardly worth my posting a separate answer when this can be improved with a small change. The point of SO is to get to the best answers. I could simply edit this, but I prefer to allow the original author a chance to make their own improvements. – S.Lott Jan 29 '10 at 16:58

In Python 2.7+, you could use collections.Counter to count items

>>> a = [1,1,1,1,2,2,2,2,3,3,4,5,5]
>>>
>>> from collections import Counter
>>> c=Counter(a)
>>>
>>> c.values()
[4, 4, 2, 1, 2]
>>>
>>> c.keys()
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
share|improve this answer
seta = set(a)
b = [a.count(el) for el in seta]
a = list(seta) #Only if you really want it.
share|improve this answer
2  
using lists count is ridiculously expensive and uncalled for in this scenario. – Idan K Jan 29 '10 at 12:20

For your first question, iterate the list and use a dictionary to keep track of an elements existsence.

For your second question, just use the set operator.

share|improve this answer
1  
Can you please elaborate on the first answer – Bruce Jan 29 '10 at 12:14

This answer is more explicit

a = [1,1,1,1,2,2,2,2,3,3,3,4,4]

d = {}
for item in a:
    if item in d:
        d[item] = d.get(item)+1
    else:
        d[item] = 1

for k,v in d.items():
    print(str(k)+':'+str(v))

# output
#1:4
#2:4
#3:3
#4:2

#remove dups
d = set(a)
print(d)
#{1, 2, 3, 4}
share|improve this answer

Yet another solution with another algorithm without using collections:

def countFreq(A):
   n=len(A)
   count=[0]*n                     # Create a new list initialized with '0'
   for i in range(n):
      count[A[i]]+= 1              # increase occurrence for value A[i]
   return [x for x in count if x]  # return non-zero count
share|improve this answer
#!usr/bin/python
def frq(words):
    freq = {}
    for w in words:
            if w in freq:
                    freq[w] = freq.get(w)+1
            else:
                    freq[w] =1
    return freq

fp = open("poem","r")
list = fp.read()
fp.close()
input = list.split()
print input
d = frq(input)
print "frequency of input\n: "
print d
fp1 = open("output.txt","w+")
for k,v in d.items():
fp1.write(str(k)+':'+str(v)+"\n")
fp1.close()
share|improve this answer

I would simply use scipy.stats.itemfreq in the following manner:

from scipy.stats import itemfreq

a = [1,1,1,1,2,2,2,2,3,3,4,5,5]

freq = itemfreq(a)

a = freq[:,0]
b = freq[:,1]

you may check the documentation here: http://docs.scipy.org/doc/scipy-0.16.0/reference/generated/scipy.stats.itemfreq.html

share|improve this answer

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