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I've a python script that after some computing will generate two data files formatted as gnuplot input.

How do I 'call' gnuplot from python ?

I want to send the following python string as input to gnuplot:

"plot '%s' with lines, '%s' with points;" % (eout,nout)

where 'eout' and 'nout' are the two filenames.

PS: I prefer not to use additional python modules (eg. gnuplot-py), only the standard API.

Thank You

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You want to call gnuplot using API (which is in C, so you would have to write some glue code like the one in gnuplot-py) or just execute "gnuplot" in shell? –  krzyk Jan 29 '10 at 12:47
    
Just execute gnuplot in shell. –  Andrei Ciobanu Jan 29 '10 at 12:56
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7 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

A simple approach might be to just write a third file containing your gnuplot commands and then tell Python to execute gnuplot with that file. Say you write

"plot '%s' with lines, '%s' with points;" % (eout,nout)

to a file called tmp.gp. Then you can use

from os import system, remove
system('gnuplot tmp.gp')
remove('tmp.gp')
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2  
Thanks, this hack eventually worked. One mention: system('gnuplot -persist tmp.gp') in order to persist the windows after the script finishes. –  Andrei Ciobanu Jan 29 '10 at 13:22
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The subprocess module lets you call other programs:

import subprocess
plot = subprocess.Popen(['gnuplot'], stdin=subprocess.PIPE)
plot.communicate("plot '%s' with lines, '%s' with points;" % (eout,nout))
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After reading your example, I've written a similar function, unfortunately, no results. (POpen = Popen, a typo I believe, but this wasn't the problem) –  Andrei Ciobanu Jan 29 '10 at 12:56
1  
Yes, POpen was a typo. Aside from that, maybe you need to specify the full path to gnuplot or add the '-persist' switch you mention in another comment. You can also check plot.returncode for errors. –  sth Jan 29 '10 at 14:10
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Subprocess is explained very clearly on Doug Hellemann's Python Module of the Week

This works well:

import subprocess
proc = subprocess.Popen(['gnuplot','-p'], 
                        shell=True,
                        stdin=subprocess.PIPE,
                        )
proc.stdin.write('set xrange [0:10]; set yrange [-2:2]\n')
proc.stdin.write('plot sin(x)\n')
proc.stdin.write('quit\n') #close the gnuplot window

One could also use 'communicate' but the plot window closes immediately unless a gnuplot pause command is used

proc.communicate("""
set xrange [0:10]; set yrange [-2:2]
plot sin(x)
pause 4
""")
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Use shell=False and gnuplot --persist if you just want to show the window, and not have Python close it... –  sdaau Dec 7 '13 at 22:23
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I was trying to do something similar, but additionally I wanted to feed data from within python and output the graph file as a variable (so neither the data nor the graph are actual files). This is what I came up with:

#! /usr/bin/env python

import subprocess
from sys import stdout, stderr
from os import linesep as nl

def gnuplot_ExecuteCommands(commands, data):
    args = ["gnuplot", "-e", (";".join([str(c) for c in commands]))]
    program = subprocess.Popen(\
        args, \
        stdin=subprocess.PIPE, \
        stdout=subprocess.PIPE, \
        stderr=subprocess.PIPE, \
        )
    for line in data:
        program.stdin.write(str(line)+nl)
    return program

def gnuplot_GifTest():
    commands = [\
        "set datafile separator ','",\
        "set terminal gif",\
        "set output",\
        "plot '-' using 1:2 with linespoints, '' using 1:2 with linespoints",\
        ]
    data = [\
        "1,1",\
        "2,2",\
        "3,5",\
        "4,2",\
        "5,1",\
        "e",\
        "1,5",\
        "2,4",\
        "3,1",\
        "4,4",\
        "5,5",\
        "e",\
        ]
    return (commands, data)

if __name__=="__main__":
    (commands, data) = gnuplot_GifTest()
    plotProg = gnuplot_ExecuteCommands(commands, data)
    (out, err) = (plotProg.stdout, plotProg.stderr)
    stdout.write(out.read())

That script dumps the graph to stdout as the last step in main. The equivalent command line (where the graph is piped to 'out.gif') would be:

gnuplot -e "set datafile separator ','; set terminal gif; set output; plot '-' using 1:2 with linespoints, '' using 1:2 with linespoints" > out.gif
1,1
2,2
3,5
4,2
5,1
e
1,5
2,4
3,1
4,4
5,5
e
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Here's a class that provides an interface to wgnuplot.exe:

from ctypes import *
import time
import sys
import os

#
# some win32 constants
#
WM_CHAR     = 0X0102
WM_CLOSE    = 16
SW_HIDE     = 0
STARTF_USESHOWWINDOW = 1

WORD    = c_ushort
DWORD   = c_ulong
LPBYTE  = POINTER(c_ubyte)
LPTSTR  = POINTER(c_char) 
HANDLE  = c_void_p

class STARTUPINFO(Structure):
    _fields_ = [("cb",DWORD),
        ("lpReserved",LPTSTR), 
        ("lpDesktop", LPTSTR),
        ("lpTitle", LPTSTR),
        ("dwX", DWORD),
        ("dwY", DWORD),
        ("dwXSize", DWORD),
        ("dwYSize", DWORD),
        ("dwXCountChars", DWORD),
        ("dwYCountChars", DWORD),
        ("dwFillAttribute", DWORD),
        ("dwFlags", DWORD),
        ("wShowWindow", WORD),
        ("cbReserved2", WORD),
        ("lpReserved2", LPBYTE),
        ("hStdInput", HANDLE),
        ("hStdOutput", HANDLE),
        ("hStdError", HANDLE),]

class PROCESS_INFORMATION(Structure):
    _fields_ = [("hProcess", HANDLE),
        ("hThread", HANDLE),
        ("dwProcessId", DWORD),
        ("dwThreadId", DWORD),]

#
# Gnuplot
#
class Gnuplot:
    #
    # __init__
    #
    def __init__(self, path_to_exe):
        # open gnuplot
        self.launch(path_to_exe)
        # wait till it's ready
        if(windll.user32.WaitForInputIdle(self.hProcess, 1000)):
            print "Error: Gnuplot timeout!"
            sys.exit(1)
        # get window handles
        self.hwndParent = windll.user32.FindWindowA(None, 'gnuplot')
        self.hwndText = windll.user32.FindWindowExA(self.hwndParent, None, 'wgnuplot_text', None)



    #
    # __del__
    #
    def __del__(self):
        windll.kernel32.CloseHandle(self.hProcess);
        windll.kernel32.CloseHandle(self.hThread);
        windll.user32.PostMessageA(self.hwndParent, WM_CLOSE, 0, 0)


    #
    # launch
    #
    def launch(self, path_to_exe):
        startupinfo = STARTUPINFO()
        process_information = PROCESS_INFORMATION()

        startupinfo.dwFlags = STARTF_USESHOWWINDOW
        startupinfo.wShowWindow = SW_HIDE

        if windll.kernel32.CreateProcessA(path_to_exe, None, None, None, False, 0, None, None, byref(startupinfo), byref(process_information)):
            self.hProcess = process_information.hProcess
            self.hThread = process_information.hThread
        else:
            print "Error: Create Process - Error code: ", windll.kernel32.GetLastError()
            sys.exit(1)



    #
    # execute
    #
    def execute(self, script, file_path):
        # make sure file doesn't exist
        try: os.unlink(file_path)
        except: pass

        # send script to gnuplot window
        for c in script: windll.user32.PostMessageA(self.hwndText, WM_CHAR, ord(c), 1L)

        # wait till gnuplot generates the chart
        while( not (os.path.exists(file_path) and (os.path.getsize(file_path) > 0))): time.sleep(0.01)
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I went with Ben's suggestion as I was computing charts from a celery job and found that it would lockup when reading from stdout. I redesigned it like so using StringIO to create the file destined for stdin and subprocess.communicate to get the result immediately via stdout, no read required.


from subprocess import Popen, PIPE
from StringIO import StringIO                                            
from os import linesep as nl

def gnuplot(commands, data):                                                    
    """ drive gnuplot, expects lists, returns stdout as string """              

    dfile = StringIO()                                                          
    for line in data:                                                           
        dfile.write(str(line) + nl)                                             

    args = ["gnuplot", "-e", (";".join([str(c) for c in commands]))]            
    p = Popen(args, stdin=PIPE, stdout=PIPE, stderr=PIPE)                       

    dfile.seek(0)                                                               
    return p.communicate(dfile.read())[0]   

def gnuplot_GifTest():
    commands = [\
        "set datafile separator ','",\
        "set terminal gif",\
        "set output",\
        "plot '-' using 1:2 with linespoints, '' using 1:2 with linespoints",\
        ]
    data = [\
        "1,1",\
        "2,2",\
        "3,5",\
        "4,2",\
        "5,1",\
        "e",\
        "1,5",\
        "2,4",\
        "3,1",\
        "4,4",\
        "5,5",\
        "e",\
        ]
    return (commands, data)

if __name__=="__main__":
    (commands, data) = gnuplot_GifTest()
    print gnuplot(commands, data)
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I am a bit late, but since it took me some time to make it work, maybe it's worth putting a note. The programs are working with Python 3.3.2 on Windows.

Notice that bytes are used everywhere, not strings (e.g. b"plot x", not simply "plot x"), but in case it's a problem, simply do something like:

"plot x".encode("ascii")

First solution: use communicate to send everything, and close when it's done. One must not forget pause, or the window is closed at once. However, it's not a problem if gnuplot is used to store images in files.

from subprocess import *
path = "C:\\app\\gnuplot\\bin\\gnuplot"
p = Popen([path], stdin=PIPE, stdout=PIPE)
p.communicate(b"splot x*y\npause 4\n")

Second solution: send commands one after another, using stdin.write(...). But, don't forget flush! (this is what I didn't get right at first) And use terminate to close the connection and gnuplot when the job is done.

from subprocess import *
path = "C:\\app\\gnuplot\\bin\\gnuplot"
p = Popen([path], stdin=PIPE, stdout=PIPE)

p.stdin.write(b"splot x*y\n")
p.stdin.flush()
...
p.stdin.write(b"plot x,x*x\n")
p.stdin.flush()
...
p.terminate()
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