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The following code gives me the errors:

Cannot implicitly convert type T to string.
Cannot implicitly convert type T to int.

What do I have to do to get this method to return the type of variable I define with T when I call it?

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace TestGener234
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("his first name is {0}", GetPropertyValue<string>("firstName"));
            Console.WriteLine("his age is {0}", GetPropertyValue<int>("age"));
        }

        public static T GetPropertyValue<T>(string propertyIdCode)
        {
            if (propertyIdCode == "firstName")
                return "Jim";
            if (propertyIdCode == "age")
                return 32;
            return null;
        }
    }
}

Addendum:

Here is a more complete example of why I needed the generic solution, i.e. I have a class that saves its values as strings no matter what the type, and this generic solution simply makes the calling code cleaner:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace TestGener234
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            List<Item> items = Item.GetItems();
            foreach (var item in items)
            {
                string firstName = item.GetPropertyValue<string>("firstName");
                int age = item.GetPropertyValue<int>("age");
                Console.WriteLine("First name is {0} and age is {1}.", firstName, age);
            }
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }

    public class Item
    {
        public string FirstName { get; set; }
        public string Age { get; set; }


        public static List<Item> GetItems()
        {
            List<Item> items = new List<Item>();
            items.Add(new Item { FirstName = "Jim", Age = "34" });
            items.Add(new Item { FirstName = "Angie", Age = "32" });
            return items;
        }

        public T GetPropertyValue<T>(string propertyIdCode)
        {
            if (propertyIdCode == "firstName")
                return (T)(object)FirstName;
            if (propertyIdCode == "age")
                return (T)(object)(Convert.ToInt32(Age));
            return default(T);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Casting inside the generic method is usually a design problem. Can you explain a bit better what the GetPropertyValue method should do? Does it return values of other object's properties by name? –  Groo Jan 29 '10 at 13:24
1  
What if someone does GetPropertyValue<int>("firstName") ? –  Hans Kesting Jan 29 '10 at 13:34
    
that would simply be a mistake just as you could make a mistake in the scenario returning an object, e.g. string firstName = (int)GetPropertyValue("firstName"), it's just cleaner code to send the type you want and let the method to all the Convert.ToInt32(...), etc., I posted a more complete example to show how this is actually being use (in a scenario where a class saves all its fields as strings) –  Edward Tanguay Jan 29 '10 at 13:45
    
it just seems the only way to "put the casting down into the method" is to use generics to tell it what type I want it to cast to, what other way could I blackbox up the casting, in the application I have dates, bool, etc. and I just want to simple to call it –  Edward Tanguay Jan 29 '10 at 13:54
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8 Answers 8

up vote 10 down vote accepted

That is troublesome; to make the compiler happy you can double-cast, but that implies a box for value types:

    public static T GetPropertyValue<T>(string propertyIdCode)
    {
        if (propertyIdCode == "firstName")
            return (T)(object)"Jim";
        if (propertyIdCode == "age")
            return (T)(object)32;
        return default(T);
    }

In reality, I think you may be better just using an object return type.

share|improve this answer
    
That is exactly what I wanted, thanks, but I would be interested to know though why you think returning object would be better, I thought that was the problem that generics solves: allowing you to return type-safe variables. –  Edward Tanguay Jan 29 '10 at 13:10
    
@Edward: Deciding return type based on input parameters is confusing and can lead to errors. What if there is mismatch between type provided in the method call and the actual type of the object being returned. Boom. You have an exception. You can use (int)GetPropertyValue("age") (if you decided to do this without generics as indicated in my answer) but even this can cause an exception. I would split this method into multiple methods each of those methods would then return one information item (age, name, etc..). –  chikak Jan 29 '10 at 13:21
2  
Yes, but - you're using it in a strange way. Your method decides depending on the content of the parameter what type it returns. Your way to use generics is just a fancy way to cast, really. if you use GetPropertyValue<string>( or (string)GetPropertyValue( doesn't change the fact that you, as the caller, have to know the return type and specify it explicitly. You win nothing, imo. –  Benjamin Podszun Jan 29 '10 at 13:24
3  
@Benjamin: I like this "Your way to use generics is just a fancy way to cast" :-) –  chikak Jan 29 '10 at 13:27
1  
it just means I don't have to do the messy caching in the calling code, it is blackboxed in the method, what I win is simplified calling code –  Edward Tanguay Jan 29 '10 at 13:50
show 1 more comment

This is an abuse of generics. If you have a small number of types that the generic type parameter could possibly be then just replace it with that many methods:

string GetTextProperty(string propertyName) { ... }
int GetNumberProperty(string propertyName) { ... }
Giraffe GetGiraffeProperty(string propertyName) { ... }
share|improve this answer
    
Maybe its just a sample he provided and not the actual... –  John G Jan 29 '10 at 20:03
    
yes I could do that but it is just more code, this (mis)use of generics works just as well and is less code, call me a pragmatist –  Edward Tanguay Jan 30 '10 at 13:39
add comment

This should work...

  public static T GetPropertyValue<T>(string propertyIdCode)
  {
     if (propertyIdCode == "firstName")
        return (T)Convert.ChangeType("Jim", typeof(T));
     if (propertyIdCode == "age")
        return (T)Convert.ChangeType(22, typeof(T));
     return default(T);
  }
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add comment

GetPropertyValue<string>("age") wants to return a string. Change it to GetPropertyValue<int>("age") and it will work as long as "age" is your parameter value.

Your implementation would be better off getting the type of the generic parameter T in order to choose what to return instead of basing it on the function parameter.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace TestGener234
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("his first name is {0}", GetPropertyValue<string>("firstName"));
            Console.WriteLine("his age is {0}", GetPropertyValue<int>("age"));
        }

        public static T GetPropertyValue<T>(string propertyIdCode)
        {
            if (typeof(T) == typeof(string) && propertyIdCode == "firstName")
                return "Jim";
            if (typeof(T) == typeof(string) && propertyIdCode == "age")
                return "32";
            if (typeof(T) == typeof(int) && propertyIdCode == "age")
                return 32;
            throw (new ArgumentException());
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That may be true, but it is unrelated to the compile error, which is inside GetPropertyValue –  Marc Gravell Jan 29 '10 at 13:03
    
sorry, that was just a typo, corrected –  Edward Tanguay Jan 29 '10 at 13:05
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You can return object from GetPropertyValue and then do a cast. You are trying to use a generic method to return specific types depending on input parameters. Sounds confusing :-)

public static object GetPropertyValue(string propertyIdCode)
    {
        if (propertyIdCode == "firstName")
            return "Jim";
        if (propertyIdCode == "age")
            return 32;
        return null;
    }

and then cast (int)GetPropertyValue("age");

share|improve this answer
    
hmm, why do you think int age = GetPropertyValue<int>("age") is more confusing than (int)GetPropertyValue("age")? it just seems more type safe to me (???) –  Edward Tanguay Jan 29 '10 at 13:16
    
What is confusing is that "age" is deciding the flow in your method which is then returning an int. Input parameter is affecting the type of output parameter. if I changed the method code to if (propertyIdCode == "age") return new ComplexObject(); this will lead to runtime errors and you are no longer protected by type safety offered by generics –  chikak Jan 29 '10 at 13:25
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Usually when you are casting inside a generic method, it is a design problem. Usually, you want to keep your type generic inside your method (no casting, no braching based on type), something like this:

public class Properties<T>
{
    private Dictionary<string, T> _dict = new Dictionary<string, T>();

    public void SetPropertyValue<T>(string propertyIdCode, T value)
    {
        _dict[propertyIdCode] = value;
    }

    public T GetPropertyValue<T>(string propertyIdCode)
    {
        return _dict[propertyIdCode];
    }
}

On, the other hand, if you want to access object's properties through their name (it seems like this is what you are doing, sorry if I got it wrong), the right way would be to use reflection (PropertyInfo.GetValue):

public object GetPropertyValue(object obj, string propertyIdCode)
{
    PropertyInfo pinfo = obj.GetType().GetProperty(propertyIdCode);
    return pinfo.GetValue(obj, null);
}
share|improve this answer
    
This assumes a single type of value for the property! –  Stevo3000 Jan 29 '10 at 13:31
    
Yes, exactly like List<T>, Dictionary<Tk,Tv> and other generic classes. This is an example of a reasonable use of generics, not the way to solve the OP's problem. –  Groo Jan 29 '10 at 13:38
add comment
    public static T GetPropertyValue<T>(string propertyIdCode)
    {
        object result = null;
        if (propertyIdCode == "firstName")
            result = "Jim";
        if (propertyIdCode == "age")
            result = 32;
        return result == null ? default(T) : (T)result;
    }
share|improve this answer
add comment

Marc's example of double-casting is the correct way to get the compiler to behave correctly.

You could write a sperate method for each value type and have a generic method for reference types. This would stop stop boxing on value types.

This is only useful if the objects being accessed are not boxed for storage (e.g. not stored as an object).

public static T GetPropertyValue<T>(string propertyIdCode)
{
}

public static int GetPropertyInt(string propertyIdCode)
{
}
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