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When testing a VOIP or a background fetch application, testing against background termination and launch is vital to see if the desired outcome is achieved. Right now, launching 28 applications including five games doesn't show any applications being killed due to memory hogs. The five games are NBA GM, CEASAR SLOTS, STELLA WARS, CRASH DRIVE 2, WATER 2.

What needs to be checked is, if any applications get killed on low memory conditions. Any ideas on triggering that kind of condition?

(VOIP apps won't be killed if the socket is active, but why aren't any applications getting killed?)

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Thanks in advance! :-) –  Ravindranath Akila Feb 7 '14 at 5:44
1  
There is a "Simulate Memory Warning" under hardware option in the simulator's menu. Application's -applicationDidReceiveMemoryWarning: & UIViewController's -didReceiveMemoryWarning methods are used in this scenario. –  staticVoidMan Feb 7 '14 at 5:58
    
Looks like a good approach to me. I wish a similar option was there on actual devices. Thanks @staticVoidMan! –  Ravindranath Akila Feb 7 '14 at 10:33
    
this answer seems to do the trick on device -- answer link –  staticVoidMan Feb 7 '14 at 11:01

2 Answers 2

There is a "Simulate Memory Warning" under hardware option in the simulator's menu.

Methods used in this scenario are:

  • UIApplication's -applicationDidReceiveMemoryWarning:
  • UIViewController's -didReceiveMemoryWarning

But... since there is no "Simulate Memory Warning" option on device, you can manually invoke these methods (thanks to this answer) but imho, can be improved with the use of NSNotificationCenter:

Example:

Post notification on button click event or similar to manually simulate a memory warning.

[[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] postNotificationName:@"SimulateMemoryWarning"
                                                    object:nil];

In your UIViewController subclass:

In whichever UIViewController class you are/would implement didReceiveMemoryWarning

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    //...
    [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserver:self 
                                             selector:@selector(didReceiveMemoryWarning)
                                                 name:@"SimulateMemoryWarning"
                                               object:nil];
    //...
}

-(void)didReceiveMemoryWarning
{
    [super didReceiveMemoryWarning];

    NSLog(@"Memory warning in a UIViewController class");
    //...
}

in AppDelegate

- (BOOL)application:(UIApplication *)application didFinishLaunchingWithOptions:(NSDictionary *)launchOptions
{
    //...
    [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserver:self 
                                             selector:@selector(didReceiveMemoryWarning)
                                                 name:@"SimulateMemoryWarning"
                                               object:nil];
    //...
}

-(void)didReceiveMemoryWarning
{
    [[UIApplication sharedApplication] performSelector:@selector(didReceiveMemoryWarning)];
}

-(void)applicationDidReceiveMemoryWarning:(UIApplication *)application
{
    NSLog(@"Memory warning in AppDelegate");
}

Note: Comment/Remove this logic after you're done with it (obviously)

PS: The NSNotifcation logic doesn't seem like an ultimate way so you can create a tiny individual app that hogs memory or a method that does this (within the app itself).
See answer

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The last "See answer" is what gets close to what I need. Will wait a week and accept this answer. Thanks @staticVoidMan –  Ravindranath Akila Feb 10 '14 at 9:25
    
@RavindranathAkila : np :) (and yes, the linked answer is a more realistic way to test this scenario) –  staticVoidMan Feb 10 '14 at 10:00

If your goal is to test how the app recovers from sudden termination (as opposed to how it handles the termination) then the easiest way to kill the app is to stop the debugging session with xcode.

Just Build And Run while the app is running, and you get an instant recovery test.

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Rather, we wanted to simulate termination itself... –  Ravindranath Akila Aug 24 '14 at 20:07
    
Thanks for the suggestion on handling termination –  Ravindranath Akila Aug 24 '14 at 20:08

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