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I am trying to show some stats for a fictitious game.

There's a Team model, a Player model, and a Run model.

I am able to get runs for a particular month in the player model:

def count_runs(date)
 self.runs.count(:conditions => {:created_at => (date.beginning_of_month..date.end_of_month)})
end

I am able to get them in the correct order in the Team controller and model:

@players = @team.players_by_count(Date.today)

def players_by_count(date)
 @date = date
 self.players.all.sort_by{|p| [-p.count_runs(@date)]}
end

I display that in a table to show their position:

<table>
  <% @players.each_with_index do |player, index| %>
  <tr>
    <td><%= (index+1).ordinalize %></td>
    <td><%= player.name %></td>
    <td><%= player.count_runs(Date.today) %></td>
  </tr>
  <% end %>
</table>

My schema is as follows:

create_table "teams", :force => true do |t|
    t.string   "name"
    t.datetime "created_at",    :null => false
    t.datetime "updated_at",    :null => false
  end

  create_table "players", :force => true do |t|
    t.string   "name"
    t.integer  "team_id"
    t.datetime "created_at",   :null => false
    t.datetime "updated_at",   :null => false
  end

  create_table "runs", :force => true do |t|
    t.integer  "player_id"
    t.datetime "created_at",               :null => false
    t.datetime "updated_at",               :null => false
  end

I want to be able to work out what their end-of-the-month average position has been. So at the end of every month they were in positions (1st, 3rd, 1st, 5th / 4 months) = Avg position = 2.5

I'm also trying to figure out how I'd get the winner (top placed player) for each month.

Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
you can have a logic to calculate the positions, pass in the hash along with the other values like {:key => [val1, val2]} and access it accordingly...index[0] and index[1] – Bijendra Feb 7 '14 at 6:54
up vote 2 down vote accepted
+100

I would suggest creating a model that just stored these monthly aggregations:

create_table "placements", :force => true do |t|
  t.integer  "player_id"
  t.date "month"
  t.integer "runs_count", :default => 0
end

So after each run is created, perhaps add a callback like so: (You will want to do something for if you delete a run as well)

def aggregate!
  # Many different ways to accomplish this, this is just the first I thought of.
  Placements.where(player_id: self.player_id, month: self.created_at.beginning_of_month).first_or_create do |placement|
    placement.runs_count += 1
  end
end

This approach will allow you to then do the following:

class Player < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :placements
  belongs_to :team
end

class Team < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :players
  has_many :placements, through: game
end

class Placement < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :player
end

Which will allow you to then do the following:

@players = @team.players_by_count(Date.today)

becomes

@placements = @team.placements.includes(:player).where(month: Date.today.beginning_of_month).order('runs_count DESC')

That way you get the Player, their runs_count AND their positions.

So in your view you could display them like so:

<table>
  <% @placements.each_with_index do |placement, index| %>
  <tr>
    <td><%= (index+1).ordinalize %></td>
    <td><%= placement.player.name %></td>
    <td><%= placement.runs_count %></td>
  </tr>
  <% end %>
</table>

If you want to get their average placements, I'd recommend you add a new column to placements, which will store their position for that given month, so you can do the following:

positions = player.placements.pluck(:position)
average = positions.sum / positions.size.to_f

The reason I suggested this path, was because I see how query intensive your current implementation was. If you had 10 players on a team, your @team.players_by_count(Date.today) would create 11 queries (1 + players_count). Where as @team.placements.includes(:player).where(month: Date.today.beginning_of_month).order('runs_count DESC') is 2 queries regardless of Player count.

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer

If you wanted to add another column to your table, I'd create an instance method to handle the calculation:

def avg
    positions = runs.map(&:position)
    avg = positions.inject(:+) / positions.size
    return avg
end

You could also perform an SQL query to calculate the average:

   def avg
      runs.average(:positions)
   end
share|improve this answer
    
Would I still need to work out the players final position for each month? – spuggy Feb 7 '14 at 11:06
    
You'd need to have a value to calculate the average against. I don't know how your schemas are set up, so I had to guess you had a positions column. If you don't, we'll have to work it out :) If you update your question with your schemas, we'll be in a better position to help – Richard Peck Feb 7 '14 at 11:11
    
Thanks Rich. I've added the schema – spuggy Feb 7 '14 at 12:07

I'd take a different approach than the answers so far to avoid solving the problem from an implementative point of view.

Comments

IMHO the main issue that's keeping you from implementing that feature is that you're thinking too much at the database or implementation level. You talk about models in your example, so I assume your doing OOP :)

With that in mind, why not look back to the problem domain (that "slice" of the real world your modelling and trying to solve) to check if there is a concept that is not being modelled.

I'll make this up, because of the lack of context from your question, but I can imagine a podium exists where players are placed once their performance is evaluated.

From that point of view, that's what you're trying to archieve by assigning that responsiblity to the controller (sorting of the players by their run count).

A possible solution

In the problem domain, you can tell by looking at a podium who's the winner and the place each player ended up.

Again, given I don't have much context about your problem, I'd model a Podium hierarchy with two subclasses.

class Podium

    def self.monthly players, date
        MonthlyPodium.new players, date
    end

    def self.average podia
        AveragePodium.new podia
    end

    def players
        fail 'subclass responsibility'
    end

    def place_of a_player
        fail 'subclass responsibility'
    end

    def winner
        fail 'subclass responsibility'
    end

end

First one would be a MonthlyPodium that will calculate from a collection of players the winner and the place for each one as you already did:

class MonthlyPodium < Podium

    attr_reader :players    

    def initialize players, a_date
        @players = players
        @time_period = a_date.beginning_of_month..a_date.end_of_month
    end

    def place_of a_player
        players_by_descending_runs.index(a_player) + 1
    end

    def winner
        players_by_descending_runs.first
    end

    def players_by_descending_runs
        @players.
            sort_by { |player| player.runs_in @time_period }.
            reverse
    end

end

To be able to reuse the calculation of the monthly winner/places to work out the averages, the second subclass named AveragePodium for the lack of a better name, is created with a collection of podiums to calculate the average position and winner:

class AveragePodium < Podium

    def initialize podia
        @podia = podia
    end

    def players
        @podia.
            collect(&:players).
            flatten.
            uniq
    end     

    def place_of a_player
        places = @podia.collect { |podium| podium.place_of a_player }
        places.inject(:+) / places.size
    end

    def winner
        players.max_by { |player| place_of player }
    end

end

Notes

Creation of instances of both subclasses is being done through the abstract class, Podium.
Because the hierarchy is polymorphic, you dont need to know if an object is an instance of an specific class.

Also, only references to the abstract class should be present in your code.

I'm not using the DB at all, even though I used the :runs_in method to keep the solution in the context of your problem. I tried to express the solution with a pure OO design, one that matches as close as possible the domain you're trying to solve.

What about the view

Well, I think the view would be more that happy to work with polymorphic objects. You can ask any instance of Podium for the players, places and winner without knowing the class they´re instance of.

What about the DB/Performance

That's another song. In other words, how you retrieve your objects from the DB to build up the model is not responsiblity of the Team/Player/Run. They should be persistance-agnostic as much as possible (I say that because AR will always be in the way).

That's why I don't agree with the DB-driven solutions so far. Most of them revolve around performance optimizations (i.e. keep a count of the runs so you don't have to calculate it all the time).

One you know the players you need to calculate the score from, you can fetch them all at once and build the model. From that moment on, you'll only be working with objects. Forget about the DB.

Funny things

Notice how Ruby lacks a good model for representing months. You have to deal with it by passing around a date and asking for the beginning_of_month/end_of_month. It would be nice/better to have that object modelled instead if implementing it in the MonthlyPodium class.

All Podium objects are created complete and valid. That is, they get all objects they need to do their work via constructor.

Also, the view does even less work by working with Podium objects. It should be limited to iterate the players (obtained from the podium itself) and render the winner/positions the way you want.

Final comments

I've focused to show my point from the conceptual/design point of view, adding implementation of methods just to show a possible way to do it.

For sure they can be improved/optimized/fixed as needed :)

share|improve this answer

You will need to use group, having and order with avg() in your select clause to get the correct SQL generated in your query.

The ActiveRecord documentation has an example very similar to what you are asking.

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