Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let's say I have this method in my base class.

public virtual void Close ()
{
    if (!IsOpen) return;

    Dispose();
    RaiseClosed();
}

I want child class to freely modify the method, but make sure it calls Dispose() first, then later it calls RaiseClosed(). They can do anything in before, after, or in between the two.

How can I enforce child classes to call Dispose() and RaiseClosed() at some point?

EDIT: I guess I didn't clarify the question well. Derived methods may do something before/after Dispose(), and before/after RaiseClosed(). So it's not sufficient to make sure it calls Dispose() and RaiseClosed() in an order because the derived methods may do something in between, or even after RaiseClosed().

share|improve this question
    
You just override that method in your child. In a new method you can call Dispose() and RaiseClosed() anytime. –  athabaska Feb 7 at 7:30
1  
You know the old saying: "If you want something done right, do it yourself.". –  Jonathon Reinhart Feb 7 at 7:31
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

One way is to simply not make Close a virtual method. Instead have another method which is specifically designed to be overriden and call that from your Close method which itself properly enforces the variants you want

public void Close() { 
  if (!IsOpen) return;

  try { 
    CloseCore();
  }
  finally { 
    Dispose();
    RaiseClosed();
  }
}

protected virtual void CloseCore()
{
  // Derived types override this to customize their close
  // behavior 
}
share|improve this answer
    
But what if the derived method wants to do something after Dispose()? –  CookieMonster Feb 7 at 7:33
    
@CookieMonster then add another method for them to customize like ClosePostDispose –  JaredPar Feb 7 at 7:34
1  
@CookieMonster: this called "Template method" (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Template_method_pattern). You just need to add new virtual methods, when you need to extend functionality in derived classes. –  Dennis Feb 7 at 7:34
    
Ok, but as I said the question, the derived method can do anything before or after Dipose(), and it goes the same for RaiseClosed(). I wanted to achieve that flexibility. Does this mean I need to create PreDispose(), PostDispose(), PostRaiseClosed()? But not all derived methods will use all of these, so I was wondering if there was a cleaner way. –  CookieMonster Feb 7 at 7:35
    
@CookieMonster if you want to absolutely enforce that your Dispose method is called and that code can run before and after it then there really isn't a much better way than to follow this basic outline. It's a bit verbose but it will get the job done and is a fairly established pattern –  JaredPar Feb 7 at 7:38
show 2 more comments

First declare the method as not virtual in the following way:

public void Close ()
{
    if (!IsOpen) return;

    DoClosingStuff();

    Dispose();
    RaiseClosed();
}

and then make virtual the method DoClosingStuff()

public virtual void DoClosingStuff()
{
}
share|improve this answer
    
How that is different form this answer? –  Sriram Sakthivel Feb 7 at 7:33
    
It is not! I saw this answer after I had posted mine. –  Trifon Feb 7 at 7:35
add comment

There is no way, all you can enforce is in declaration. As Jared proposed, you could offer method templates that can be executed in your predicted frame. Another way you can circumvent this is using events, but basically the pattern is the same. You just offer hooks to add code to...

public event Action BeforeDispose;
public event Action AfterDispose;

public virtual void Close ()
{    
    if (BeforeDispose != null) BeforeDispose.Invoke();
    Dispose();
    if (AfterDispose != null) AfterDispose.Invoke();
    RaiseClosed();
}

That way you can restrict the kind of delegate type that can be performed in your Template and Child classes can handle these events or just ignore them. Although, I don't think that there's an advantage to this approach over Jared's...

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.