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I'm looking to have a list of objects belong to a parent class, in the following manner:

class A(object):
    __tablename__ = 'a'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    collection = relationship(.....) # contains an ordered list of [B, C, B, B, C, C, C, B, C, C, ...];

class B(object):
    __tablename__ = 'b'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)

class C(object):
    __tablename__ = 'c'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)

The SQLAlchemy examples folder has a simple many-to-one where, in my example, classes B and C are "parent" classes of A (rather than the other way around), but I can't for the life of me work out how to reverse this into a one-to-many, and then add a bidirectional relationship so that it becomes many-to-many.

Can anyone help me out with this?

share|improve this question
    
Are they (class B and class C) same or not? –  Syed Habib M Feb 7 at 9:42
    
No, they're different classes with different fields. –  Ben Stott Feb 7 at 9:53
    
Then, What are the relations between class A and class B and between class A and class C? –  Syed Habib M Feb 7 at 10:17
    
In terms of abstract objects they represent different things; currently there's A and B have a many-to-many (as do A and C) but I believe this is irrelevant if I can work out how to create the ordered list collection. –  Ben Stott Feb 7 at 10:21

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

it's a little painful and AbstractConcreteBase apparently needs a bit more polish, but it's like this:

from sqlalchemy import *
from sqlalchemy.orm import *
from sqlalchemy.ext.declarative import declarative_base, AbstractConcreteBase

Base = declarative_base()

class A(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'a'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)

class BC(AbstractConcreteBase, Base):
    pass

class B(BC):
    __tablename__ = 'b'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)

    a_id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('a.id'))
    __mapper_args__ = {
        "polymorphic_identity": "b",
        "concrete": True
    }

class C(BC):
    __tablename__ = 'c'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    a_id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('a.id'))
    __mapper_args__ = {
        "polymorphic_identity": "c",
        "concrete": True
    }

configure_mappers()
A.collection = relationship(BC, primaryjoin=BC.a_id == A.id)

engine = create_engine("sqlite://", echo=True)

Base.metadata.create_all(engine)

sess = Session(engine)

sess.add_all([
    A(collection=[
        B(),
        C(),
        C()
    ]),
    A(collection=[
        B(),
        B()
    ])
])

sess.commit()

for a in sess.query(A):
    for bc in a.collection:
        print a, bc
share|improve this answer
    
Holy crap that's significantly cleaner than what I came up with -- eventually my solution used class BC(Base): __mapper_args__ = { 'polymorphic_on': type, 'polymorphic_identity': 'bc', 'with_polymorphic': '*' } and then both B and C were forced to have a bc_id column. –  Ben Stott Feb 10 at 22:37

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