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Say I have the following class:

public class ContactUsFormModel : AddressModel
{
    [DisplayName("Title")]
    [StringLength(5)]
    public string Title { get; set; }
    [DisplayName("First name (required)")]

    [Required(ErrorMessage = "Please enter your first name")]
    [StringLength(50, ErrorMessage = "Please limit your first name to {1} characters.")]
    public string FirstName { get; set; }

    // etc...
}

Am I able to add a required attribute to a property from the AddressModel class in the ContactUsFormModel class?

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Yes... I use this in MVC all the time, what is the problem? How to process the attribute? –  CodeBlend Feb 7 '14 at 9:45
    
I have the address model which on most forms is not required but on one form where we send out brochures it is required so I need to add a [Required(ErrorMessage = "Please enter your postcode")] to the base class but just for this one form - I don't want to have to make a new address model just for this as it is using it's own partial to do some ajax autofilling –  Pete Feb 7 '14 at 9:48
    
"...so I need to add a [Required(ErrorMessage = "Please enter your postcode")] to the base class but just for this one form..." Base class is for 'everywhere'. Does your suggested approach not work? –  CodeBlend Feb 7 '14 at 9:53
1  
couldn't you just mark the base class's property virtual and override it in this child class? Then you could add whatever attributes you want and it would only affect this class. The same partial views should work because this child class is still an instance of Address by inheritance... –  ps2goat Jul 22 '14 at 21:43
1  
@ps2goat, I tried the virtual thing and it only half worked - it allowed the required attribute to work but it didn't override the display name –  Pete Jul 23 '14 at 8:15

2 Answers 2

Try to Use MetadatatypeAttribute. Create seprate class for metadata where you directly add attributes to your properties.

[MetadataType(typeof(MyModelMetadata ))]
public class ContactUsFormModel : AddressModel
{
    [DisplayName("Title")]
    [StringLength(5)]
    public string Title { get; set; }
    [DisplayName("First name (required)")]

    [Required(ErrorMessage = "Please enter your first name")]
    [StringLength(50, ErrorMessage = "Please limit your first name to {1} characters.")]
    public string FirstName { get; set; }

    // etc...
}

internal class MyModelMetadata {
    [Required]
    public string SomeProperyOfModel { get; set; }
}

[Edit] Above method is not useful for you, as you said it will not add attributes to base class.

So make the properties in AddressModel virtual and override them in ContactUsFormModel and this way you can add attribute.

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Unfortunately this doesn't work as it doesn't override the AddressModel's properties –  Pete Feb 7 '14 at 10:11
    
Just seen your edit - it only half works, the required now works where I want it to but it doesn't change the display name, can that not be overridden? –  Pete Feb 7 '14 at 14:55
    
It also doesn't pick up the ajax validation for some reason –  Pete Feb 7 '14 at 15:03
    
try to put partial keyword on your class. E.g. public partial class ContactUsFormModel –  Sameer Feb 7 '14 at 16:25
    
tried the partial thing but it made no difference –  Pete Feb 10 '14 at 15:56

Ok I have found a workaround to this by adding a new property to the class:

public bool AddressIsRequired { get; set; }

I could set this when building my model for different forms and then instead of using the normal required attribute, I made my own custom validator:

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Property, AllowMultiple = true, Inherited = true)]
public sealed class AddressRequiredAttribute : RequiredAttribute, IClientValidatable
{
    public AddressRequiredAttribute()
        : base()
    {
    }

    protected override ValidationResult IsValid(object value, ValidationContext context)
    {
        Type addresType = typeof(AddressModel);
        if (context.ObjectType == addresType || context.ObjectType.BaseType == addresType)
        {
            AddressModel baseModel = (AddressModel)context.ObjectInstance;
            if (baseModel != null && baseModel.AddressIsRequired)
            {
                return base.IsValid(value, context);
            }
        }

        return ValidationResult.Success;
    }
}

And then in my AddressModel I could mark my properties as such:

[AddressRequired(ErrorMessage = "Please enter your Postcode")]
public string Postcode { get; set; }

I am going to leave this open if anyone is able to find a better way of doing this (ie able to just change the data-annotation without having to make a separate attribute). This way of doing things also means that if you extend the labelfor helper and use the metadata to check the IsRequired flag, the properties marked with this attribute will always be marked as required (I think this could be because it inherits from the required attribute)

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