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I'm trying to center a div vertically using line-height, without specifying a set pixel value for the line-height. I need the line-height to expand to the size of it's div. Using '100vh' works, but viewport units aren't widely supported widely enough. Setting the line-height to 100% doesn't seem to work. Here's my HTML:

<div class="background">

<div class="lightboxbg">
    <div class="wrapper">
    <div class="centerme"></div>
    </div>
</div>

</div>

And my CSS:

html, body {
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    padding: 0px;
    margin: 0px;
}

.background {
    width: 90%;
    height: 100%;
    background-color: AntiqueWhite;
}

.lightboxbg {
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    background-color: black;
    vertical-align: middle;
    text-align: center;
}

.wrapper {
    vertical-align: middle;
    line-height: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    width: 100%
}

.centerme {
    vertical-align: middle;
    display: inline-block;
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
    background-color: blue;
}

And here's a jsfiddle. The blue box would be centered if I could get the line-height of wrapper to expand to the height of wrapper, but I don't know how to go about doing that. Thanks for reading.

EDIT: Check out Nathan Lee's answer for a solution with table cells, Fredric Fohlin's for a pretty wild 'absolute positioning' answer, and MM Tac's for a solution using absolute positioning.

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3 Answers 3

Here you go.

WORKING DEMO

The CSS Change:

.lightboxbg {
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    background-color: black;
    vertical-align: middle;
    text-align: center;
    display: table;
}

.wrapper {
    vertical-align: middle;
    line-height: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    width: 100%;
    display: table-cell;
}

Hope this helps.

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1  
Sweet, that looks pretty straightforward, definitely helpful. –  Ber Feb 7 '14 at 10:31
    
Thank you @Ber :) –  NKL Feb 7 '14 at 10:32

Have a look at this idea. It may suit you: http://coding.smashingmagazine.com/2013/08/09/absolute-horizontal-vertical-centering-css/

.Center-Container { 
  position: relative;
}

.Absolute-Center {
  width: 50%;
  height: 50%;
  overflow: auto;
  margin: auto;
  position: absolute;
  top: 0; left: 0; bottom: 0; right: 0;
}

In your case the wrapper needs the relative positioning, and the "center me" the absolute positioning.

share|improve this answer
    
That's pretty cool, I haven't gotten it working on my current fiddle yet, but I'm still playing around. –  Ber Feb 7 '14 at 10:28
    
Ok, I read your other comments, and I think I need to clearify that the "center me" element needs a height set. If the element has no height it gets as the same height as the parent. –  Fredric Fohlin Feb 7 '14 at 14:54

Replace .centerme with following css:

CSS:

.centerme {
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
    background-color: blue;
    position: absolute;
    left: 50%;
    top: 50%;
    margin-left: -50px; /* negative-half of element's width*/
    margin-top: -50px; /* negative-half of element's height*/
}

Here is a DEMO and here is a full page RESULT.

UPDATE

To center div for variable length is simple, just remove height, width, margin-left, margin-top reference from .centerme css.

.centerme {
    background-color: blue;
    position: absolute;
    left: 50%;
    top: 50%;
}

Here is a UPDATED DEMO.

share|improve this answer
    
That's a useful solution, unfortunately my centerme object will have a variable height and width, I just used 100px as an example. Still, it could be accomplished with jQuery. –  Ber Feb 7 '14 at 10:29
    
It's simple, see my updated answer. –  MM Tac Feb 7 '14 at 10:33
    
Ah cool, didn't think of that. Only thing is, its centered vertically perfectly but horizontally its off, since it measures left at 50% from the very beginning of the div. Thanks for the help by the way. –  Ber Feb 7 '14 at 10:39
    
Yeah, for that you can use as answered by Nathan Lee. –  MM Tac Feb 7 '14 at 10:58

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