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I'm implementing Dijkstra's algorithm for school and my code keeps messing up. I've followed the pseudo-code on Wikipedia very closely. I implement the graph with a weighted adjacency list in this form so I check neighbours by iterating through the corresponding row.

Here's my graph class, along with my vertex struct.

struct vertex
{
    //constructor
    vertex(size_t d_arg, size_t n_arg)
    {
        n = n_arg;
        d = d_arg;
    }

    //member variables, n is name and d is distance
    size_t n;
    size_t d;

    //overloaded operator so I can use std::sort in my priority queue
    bool operator<(const vertex& rhs) const
    {
        return  d<rhs.d;
    }

};

class graph
{
public:
    graph(vector<vector<size_t> > v){ ed = v;};
    vector<size_t> dijkstra(size_t src);
    bool dfs(size_t src);
private:
    //stores my matrix describing the graph
    vector<vector<size_t> > ed;
};

The function dfs implements a Depth-first Search to check if the graph's joint. I've got no problems with it. But the function dijkstra, however, gives me the wrong values. This is how it's implemented.

vector<size_t> graph::dijkstra(size_t src)
{
    //a vector storing the distances to the vertices and a priority queue
    vector<size_t> dist;
    dist[src] = 0;
    p_q<vertex> q;

    //set the distance for the vertices to inphinity, since they're size_t and -1 is largest
    for (size_t i = 0; i < ed.size(); i++) {
        if(i!=src)
        {
            dist.push_back(-1);
        }

        //push the vertices to the priority queue
        vertex node(dist[i], i);
        q.push(node);
    }

    //while there's stuff in the queue
    while(q.size())
    {
        //c, the current vertex, becomes the top
        vertex c = q.pop();

        //iterating through all the neighbours, listed in the adjacency matrix
        for(int i = 0; i < ed[0].size(); i++)
        {
            //alternative distance to i is distance to current and distance between current and i
            size_t alt = dist[c.n] + ed[c.n][i];

            //if we've found a better distance
            if(alt < dist[i])
            {
                //new distance is alternative distance, and it's pushed into the priority queue
                dist[i] = alt;
                vertex n(alt, i);
                q.push(n);
            }

        }
    }

    return dist;
}

I can't see why I'm having trouble. I've debugged with this matrix.

 0  3 -1  1 
 3  0  4  1 
-1  4  0 -1 
 1  1 -1  0

And it didn't visit anything other than vertex 0 and vertex 3.

share|improve this question
1  
Note that Djikstra's algorithm does not work with negative edge weights. I don't know if this is the reason your implementation doesn't work. –  George Feb 7 at 10:56
1  
From the Wikipedia page you referenced: Dijkstra's algorithm, conceived by computer scientist Edsger Dijkstra in 1956 and published in 1959,[1][2] is a graph search algorithm that solves the single-source shortest path problem for a graph with non-negative edge path costs, producing a shortest path tree. –  nodakai Feb 7 at 10:57
    
If size_t is properly defined, it should be unsigned, so -1 should be the max value. Even so, it would be less confusing though more verbose to make use of std::numeric_limits<std::size_t>::max(). –  outis Feb 7 at 11:05
    
That's not the issue. I've tried with setting them to 200 000 and only having numbers smaller than that in the matrices I've read in. It behaves in the same way, and I've repeatedly checked if the comparison with -1 is larger than positive numbers. It is. Since size_t is unsigned, every bit is set to 1 and it represents the largest value the register can handle (i.e 18 quintillion on my 64 bit machine). –  pontus Feb 7 at 11:22
    
@pontus: what distances do you expect, and what do you get? Have you checked that your p_q returns the minimum element? –  outis Feb 7 at 12:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

One of the problems is right at the beginning of graph::dijkstra, when an element of zero-sized array is assigned:

vector<size_t> dist;
dist[src] = 0;

It is OK in pseudo-code, but not in C++. Perhaps you may change like this:

vector<size_t> dist;
for (size_t i = 0; i < ed.size(); i++) {
    if(i!=src)
    {
        dist.push_back(-1);
    }
    else
    {
        dist.push_back(0);
    }
    ....
share|improve this answer
1  
Alternatively, use the vector(size_t count, const T& value) constructor to initialize all entries to max, then set dist[src] as in original code. That way, there's no need for the branch within the 1st loop. –  outis Feb 7 at 11:33
    
@outis Yes, generally speaking your suggestion is better. I just wanted to minimize changes of the original code. –  AlexD Feb 7 at 12:02

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