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My error: Field 'StockManagement.LargeItems1.largeS' is never assigned to, and will always have its default value null My code:

namespace StockManagement
{
    class LargeItems1
    {
        private Stack<string> largeS;

         public LargeItems1()
        {
            Stack<string> largeS = new Stack<string>();
        }
        public void LargeItemsAdd()
        {
            string usersInput2, tempValue;
            int tempValueI = 0;
            bool attempt = false;//, whichOne = false;
            Console.WriteLine("Would you like to remove or add an item to the storage area \n Reply add OR remove");
            string usersInput = Console.ReadLine();
            usersInput = usersInput.ToLower();

            if (usersInput.Contains("remove"))
            {
                LargeItemsRemove(largeS);
                return;
            }
            else if (usersInput.Contains("add"))
            {

                Console.WriteLine("Please input (numerically) how many IDs you'd like to add");
                tempValue = Console.ReadLine();
                attempt = int.TryParse(tempValue, out tempValueI);
                while (!attempt)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("Please input (numerically) how many IDs you'd like to add, you did not input a numeric value last time");
                    tempValue = Console.ReadLine();
                    attempt = int.TryParse(tempValue, out tempValueI);
                }
                for (int i = 0; i < tempValueI; i++)
                {

                    Console.WriteLine("Please input the ID's (one at a time) of the item you would like to add");
                    usersInput2 = Console.ReadLine();
                    if (largeS.Contains(usersInput2))
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine("That ID has already been stored");
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        largeS.Push(usersInput2);
                    }
                }
                foreach (var item in largeS)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("Current (large) item ID's: " + item);
                }
            }

        }
        public void LargeItemsRemove(Stack<string> largeS)
        {
            if (largeS.Contains(null))
            {
                Console.WriteLine("No IDs stored");
            }
            else
            {

                string popped = largeS.Pop();
                foreach (var item in largeS)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("Pop: " + item);
                }
                Console.WriteLine("Removed ID = " + popped);
            }
        }

    }
}

I don't understand how to assign my values to the instances. I'd appreciate any help that can be provided!

share|improve this question
2  
You need to define it as a field or property, not as a local variable in the constructor. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173118.aspx EDIT: More info on classes in general: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/x9afc042.aspx EDITx2: Oops, missed the fact that it was declared as a field, I see it now that the format was fixed; thanks Tim. – Chris Sinclair Feb 7 '14 at 11:38

Change your constructor to initialize the field instead of the local variable:

public LargeItems1()
{
    this.largeS = new Stack<string>();
}
share|improve this answer

You have to initialize your field largeS, using the this keyword, in this way:

this.largeS = new Stack<string>();

The this keyword is used to refer to the current instance of the class. If you use instead:

Stack<string> largeS = new Stack<string>();

you're just initializing a new local variable that has nothing to do with your private field.

Check the MSDN documentation about this keyword.

share|improve this answer
1  
Great explanation!! Thanks, I was just looking the this keyword up on MSDN and your explanation helped me understand it :). – user3245390 Feb 7 '14 at 11:48

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