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same as title, I'm pretty sure it has no difference, but just to be on the safe side with standard compliance.

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6 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If your document is served as XHTML (application/xhtml+xml), then there is no difference. If it's served as HTML (text/html), only the first form is going to be parsed "correctly" by an HTML parser.

See this post for a related question.

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sorry, I missed that one. thanks for showing it to me. –  Gal Jan 29 '10 at 15:04
    
Although its not "parsed correctly" ... the closing tags for HTML are optional while The self closing tag is ignored. still valid HTML, just not W3C compliant these days. –  Reed Debaets Jan 29 '10 at 15:07
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This is not just a theoretical different in what is parsed "correctly". There's actually a practical difference.

When served as text/html to browsers other than IE, the "/" in the first case and </img> in the second case will be ignored, and the DOM created in both cases will be the same.

In IE however, in the second case the </img> is not ignored and results in an additional element in the DOM called "/IMG". It's possible for this to effect the workings of scripts that might be on the page.

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No difference. Self closing tags are just the short way of getting the same job done.

just like c++ is that same as c+=1 and c=c+1 ... just cuts down on typing.

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No there is no difference for any XML element in any XML document.

<img .../> is just a shortcut for <img...></img>

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Both methods are xhtml w3C compliant

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<img /> is the recommended way: http://www.freewebmasterhelp.com/tutorials/xhtml/2

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