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I am new to C#, I am learning it and it is just a dummy test program. I am getting the error that is mentioned in the title of this post. Below is the C# code.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.IO;

namespace DriveInfos
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Program prog = new Program();
            prog.propertyInt = 5;
            Console.WriteLine(prog.propertyInt);
            Console.Read();
        }

        class Program
        {
            public int propertyInt
            {
                get { return 1; }
                set { Console.WriteLine(value); }
            }
        }
    }
}
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marked as duplicate by Chris, 48klocs, Pierre-Luc Pineault, Mark Bell, Tom van Enckevort Feb 8 at 8:21

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

5  
What part of the error message is unclear? –  hvd Feb 7 at 14:36
5  
Why do you need a Program defined in your Program? Just change the name! –  crashmstr Feb 7 at 14:36
    
Change the name of Program which is used within Program –  Gupta Feb 7 at 14:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

When you do this:

Program prog = new Program();

The C# compiler cannot tell if you want to use the Program here:

namespace DriveInfos
{
    class Program  // This one?
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {

Or if you mean to use the other definition of Program:

    class Program
    {
        public int propertyInt
        {
            get { return 1; }
            set { Console.WriteLine(value); }
        }
    }

The best thing to do here is to change the name of the internal class, which will give you:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.IO;

namespace DriveInfos
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            MyProgramContext prog = new MyProgramContext();
            prog.propertyInt = 5;
            Console.WriteLine(prog.propertyInt);
            Console.Read();
        }

        class MyProgramContext
        {
            public int propertyInt
            {
                get { return 1; }
                set { Console.WriteLine(value); }
            }
        }
    }
}

So now there is no confusion - not for the compiler, nor for you when you come back in 6 months and try to work out what it is doing!

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for helping, your answer solved my problem. –  Muhammad Sohail Feb 7 at 14:46
    
You're welcome! Please tick the answer as correct so that it helps others in the future. –  Rob Lang Feb 7 at 14:47
2  
The compiler could have been made to be able to understand that since the classes are actually Program and Program.Program The fundamental problem is that C# spec defines that you can't do that. In VB you could create a nested class with the same name like this. I imagine the design choice was made to avoid ambiguity and confusion with constructor syntax –  Chris Feb 7 at 14:48
1  
@RobLang i thicked it as correct. Thanks for informing me about this feature of SOF. I wasn't aware of this, I am new here as well. :-) –  Muhammad Sohail Feb 7 at 14:51

you have two classes with the same name "Program" rename one of them

namespace DriveInfos
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Program prog = new Program();
            prog.propertyInt = 5;
            Console.WriteLine(prog.propertyInt);
            Console.Read();
        }

        class Program1
        {
            public int propertyInt
            {
                get { return 1; }
                set { Console.WriteLine(value); }
            }
        }
    }
}
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