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I'm using Spring to inject JMS connection factory into my Java application. Since this factory is only required within the production environment, not while I'm developing though, I put the bean definition into a separate XML which I include into my main applicationContext.xml. In production environments this extra file contains the regular bean definition. In my local dev environment I'd like this bean to be null. Trying to simply remove the bean definition all-toghether obviously caused an error when Spring came across a reference ID it didn't know.

So I tried creating a factory bean that would simply return null. If I do this, Spring (2.5.x) complains that the factory returned null although based on the Spring API doc of the FactoryBean interface I expected this to work (see Spring API doc).

The XML looks something like this:

<bean id="jmsConnectionFactoryFactory" class="de.airlinesim.jms.NullJmsConnectionFactoryFactory" />

<bean id="jmsConnectionFactory" factory-bean="jmsConnectionFactoryFactory" factory-method="getObject"/>

I'm by no means a Spring expert. What would be the "correct" way of doing this?

Thank you very much!

share|improve this question
up vote 17 down vote accepted

factory-bean/factory-method doesn't work with null, but a custom FactoryBean implementation works fine:

public class NullFactoryBean implements FactoryBean<Void> {

    public Void getObject() throws Exception {
        return null;
    }

    public Class<? extends Void> getObjectType() {
        return null;
    }

    public boolean isSingleton() {
        return true;
    }
}
<bean id="jmsConnectionFactory" class = "com.sample.NullFactoryBean" />
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much, this did the trick! – Lunikon Jan 29 '10 at 16:30
6  
There's an open feature request for this, but's been sitting there for 2 years... voting for it might help : jira.springframework.org/browse/SPR-5320 – skaffman Jan 30 '10 at 10:12
    
This didn't work for me if I used the bean in an @Autowired context. – Alex Ciminian Jul 31 '10 at 8:38
    
I get BeanCreationException if I return null. Caused by: org.springframework.beans.factory.BeanCreationException: Error creating bean with name 'nullObject' defined in class path resource [XXX.xml]: factory-bean 'NullFactoryBean' returned null – endless Sep 25 '14 at 17:02

I'm pretty sure that Spring won't allow you to associate null with a bean id or alias. You can handle this by setting properties to null.

Here's how you did this in Spring 2.5

<bean class="ExampleBean">
    <property name="email"><null/></property>
</bean>

In Spring 3.0, you should also be able to use the Spring expression language (SpEL); e.g.

<bean class="ExampleBean">
    <property name="email" value="#{ null }"/>
</bean>

or any SpEL expression that evaluates to null.

And if you are using a placeholder configurator you could possibly even do this:

<bean class="ExampleBean">
    <property name="email" value="#{ ${some.prop} }`"/>
</bean>

where some.prop could be defined in a property file as:

some.prop=null

or

some.prop=some.bean.id

Note, I haven't used SpEL (yet) so there might be problems with some of the above ...

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1  
I much prefer this solution; it does not necessitate the creation of a custom factory bean – Richard Apr 4 '13 at 15:22

Some noted above, axtact's answer doesn't work in Autowiring contextes, where Spring will rely on correct information from the getObjectType() method. So you might end up with errors like:

Caused by: org.springframework.beans.factory.NoSuchBeanDefinitionException: No matching bean of type [xxxxxxxxxxxxx] found for dependency: expected at least 1 bean which qualifies as autowire candidate for this dependency. Dependency annotations: {@org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired(required=true), @org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Qualifier(value=yyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy)}
    at org.springframework.beans.factory.support.DefaultListableBeanFactory.raiseNoSuchBeanDefinitionException(DefaultListableBeanFactory.java:920)
    at org.springframework.beans.factory.support.DefaultListableBeanFactory.doResolveDependency(DefaultListableBeanFactory.java:789)
    at org.springframework.beans.factory.support.DefaultListableBeanFactory.resolveDependency(DefaultListableBeanFactory.java:703)
    at org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.AutowiredAnnotationBeanPostProcessor$AutowiredFieldElement.inject(AutowiredAnnotatio

So here's a small variation which involves allowing users to force the objectype at construction. Using a property instead of a constructor-arg didn't work because Spring doesn't fully initialize the beans in this context.

public class NullFactoryBean implements FactoryBean {
    private final Class<?> objectType;

    public NullFactoryBean(Class<?> objectType) {
        this.objectType = objectType;
    }

    @Override
    public Object getObject() throws Exception {
        return null;
    }

    @Override
    public Class<?> getObjectType() {
        return objectType;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean isSingleton() {
        return false;
    }
}
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How do you use this in the config XML? – MikeWyatt May 10 '13 at 4:51

For anyone coming to this question, keep in mind that simply setting the @Autowired annotation as optional will do the trick (i.e. Spring will leave the reference null if no qualifying bean is found).

@Autowired(required = false)
private SomeClass someBean

Note that you would have to do this everywhere the bean is referenced, which may be a bigger hassle than creating a null-factory as mentioned above.

share|improve this answer

Can you make use of the special <null> bean element ? e.g.

<bean class="ExampleBean">
<property name="email"><null/></property>
</bean>

from the doc, section 3.3.2.5

share|improve this answer
    
This would probably work when setting the propery of the final application bean. But at this point I just provide the reference id "jmsConnectionFactory" which should then refer to either an actual bean or null (if that is possible at all). – Lunikon Jan 29 '10 at 16:12

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