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I am using RestSharp (version 104.4 via NuGet) to make calls to a Rest Web Service. I have designed a set of objects (POCO) which matches resources exposed in the API. However, my objects property names does not match those expected by the Rest Service when posting data, so I would like to "transform" them when I make a request to the Rest service to make them match match. I read that adding SerializeAs attribute (with a Name specified) on my POCO's property will make them serialize correctly, but it won't.

My POCO

Imports RestSharp.Serializers

<Serializable(), SerializeAs(Name:="ApiMember")>
Public Class ApiMember
    <SerializeAs(Name:="id")>
    Public Property Id As Integer?

    <SerializeAs(Name:="email")>
    Public Property EmailAddress As String

    <SerializeAs(Name:="firstname")>
    Public Property Firstname As String

    <SerializeAs(Name:="lastname")>
    Public Property Lastname As String
End Class

My Call to the API

Dim request As RestRequest = New RestRequest(Method.POST)
Dim member As ApiMember = new ApiMember()

member.EmailAddress = "me@example.com"

request.Resource = "members"
request.RequestFormat = DataFormat.Json
request.AddBody(member)

Dim client As RestClient = New RestClient()
client.BaseUrl = "http://url.com"
client.Authenticator = New HttpBasicAuthenticator("username", "password")
client.Execute(Of ApiGenericResponse)(request)

What ends up being posted

{"Id":null,"EmailAddress":"me@example.com","Firstname":null,"Lastname":null}

Notice the name of the properties does not match thoses I specified in SerializeAs (uppercases, name of EmailAddress)

Am I missing something ?

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1 Answer 1

In RestSharp 104.4, the default JsonSerializer doesn't use the [SerializeAs] attribute, as seen by reviewing the source code.

One workaround to this is to create a custom serializer that uses the Json.NET JsonSerializer (a good example is here) and then decorate your properties with the [JsonProperty] attribute, like so:

<JsonProperty("email")>
Public Property EmailAddress As String
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