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I am working with 1 minute solar PV interval time series data where the original time stamp had the dates and times concatenated together. I used sub() to split out the date and times, then used cbind() to add them to my dataframe. At first look everything appears fine, however I would like to build a small error checker that makes sure the dates and times match the original string and if they don't match, then it will return the row indices for me to further troubleshoot. My idea is to use grepl + which to identify the matches/mismatches. The code below shows what I am working with.

> head(data2)
   dates times         datetime use..kW.     gen..kW. Grid..kW.
1 12/31/2013 23:58 12/31/2013 23:58 1.463883 -0.003050000  1.463883
2 12/31/2013 23:57 12/31/2013 23:57 1.940267 -0.003450000  1.940267
3 12/31/2013 23:56 12/31/2013 23:56 1.934417 -0.003466667  1.934417
4 12/31/2013 23:55 12/31/2013 23:55 1.996050 -0.003550000  1.996050
5 12/31/2013 23:54 12/31/2013 23:54 2.009883 -0.003566667  2.009883
6 12/31/2013 23:53 12/31/2013 23:53 2.009967 -0.003516667  2.009967
Solar..kW. Solar...kW.
1 -0.003050000           0
2 -0.003450000           0
3 -0.003466667           0
4 -0.003550000           0
5 -0.003566667           0
6 -0.003516667           0

> a <- grepl("23:56", data2[, 3])

> which(a == TRUE)
  [1]      3   1443   2883   4323   5763   7203   8643  10083  11523

The results of which() above correspond to all the rows with "23:56" in the string in datetime column. I only copied one line of the return vector to save space...

I know that for my checker I would want to identify the false cases, TRUE is used for now just for illustration. The issue I am having relates to using more than one character string in grepl(), because I don't just want to do this with one time value, but for every row in my dataframe. I tried using the mapply with grepl, but my dataframe has 478,933 observations so it was taking way to long. The mapply + grepl looked like:

mapply(grepl, data2$dates, data2$datetime)

I've used the same mapply function with just a range of the observations (200). When which is set to TRUE I get indices for 200 rows, with FALSE I get integer(0) - which I understand would mean that my data is accurate so all this may be unnecessary... But now I am invested in the problem from more of a learning/exercise perspective and it will benefit me down the road in dealing with larger datasets.

Sorry for a long question. Thanks in advance for your suggestions.

Part 2:

My apologies for not providing reproducible data. My data is too big to post the entire dataframe to SO. Also @G.Grothendieck, I am splitting up the datetime string because I am going to use tapply or split to take the sampling distribution for each time interval, i.e. I will have 1,440 "buckets" that correspond to each minute in one day. Each bucket will be filled by the observations at that time interval from the entire year.

Here is a new version (data3) that is the head of data2. I have changed the value of data3[3,2] to be "23:57" which does not match the time in the datatime column so we can use this to test both of your solutions. Justin's are first, followed by G.Grothendieck.

> data3 <- head(data2)
> data3[3,2] <- "23:57"
> data3
       dates times         datetime use..kW.     gen..kW. Grid..kW.   Solar..kW.
1 12/31/2013 23:58 12/31/2013 23:58 1.463883 -0.003050000  1.463883 -0.003050000
2 12/31/2013 23:57 12/31/2013 23:57 1.940267 -0.003450000  1.940267 -0.003450000
3 12/31/2013 23:57 12/31/2013 23:56 1.934417 -0.003466667  1.934417 -0.003466667
4 12/31/2013 23:55 12/31/2013 23:55 1.996050 -0.003550000  1.996050 -0.003550000
5 12/31/2013 23:54 12/31/2013 23:54 2.009883 -0.003566667  2.009883 -0.003566667
6 12/31/2013 23:53 12/31/2013 23:53 2.009967 -0.003516667  2.009967 -0.003516667
  Solar...kW.
1           0
2           0
3           0
4           0
5           0
6           0
> all(paste(data3$dates, data3$times) == data3$datetime)
[1] FALSE
> which(paste(data3$dates, data3$times) != data3$datetime)
[1] 3
> with(data3, which(format(datetime) != paste(dates, times)))
[1] 3

So, they both lead to the same result... However when I used G.Grothendieck's solution on the entire dataframe (data2) it said that rows 840:24279 were mismatches. Here are the first two rows of the output:

> with(data2, which(format(datetime) != paste(dates, times)))
    [1]   840   841   842   843   844   845   846   847   848   849   850   851
   [13]   852   853   854   855   856   857   858   859   860   861   862   863

I put the first 6 rows of the mismatches into a new df (data4). Then applied each of your solutions again...

> data4
         dates times        datetime use..kW. gen..kW.  Grid..kW. Solar..kW.
840 12/31/2013  9:59 12/31/2013 9:59 4.480733 5.948300 -1.4675667   5.948300
841 12/31/2013  9:58 12/31/2013 9:58 4.503950 5.832533 -1.3285833   5.832533
842 12/31/2013  9:57 12/31/2013 9:57 4.516283 5.739600 -1.2233167   5.739600
843 12/31/2013  9:56 12/31/2013 9:56 4.906783 5.677033 -0.7702500   5.677033
844 12/31/2013  9:55 12/31/2013 9:55 5.951183 5.621617  0.3295667   5.621617
845 12/31/2013  9:54 12/31/2013 9:54 6.226417 5.596517  0.6299000   5.596517
    Solar...kW.
840    5.948300
841    5.832533
842    5.739600
843    5.677033
844    5.621617
845    5.596517
> all(paste(data4$dates, data4$times) == data4$datetime)
[1] TRUE
> which(paste(data4$dates, data4$times) != data4$datetime)
integer(0)
> with(data4, which(format(datetime) != paste(dates, times)))
integer(0)
> 

This shows again that your solutions are the same, but I am confused why when I use G.Grothendieck's on the entire dataframe (data2) why it outputs 840:24279 as being mismatches. Let me know if this data is sufficient.

share|improve this question
    
I don't understand what you are trying to do there. Why don't you turn your datetimes into POSIXct? You could even use package lubridate if base functions don't offer enough functionality for your tastes. – Roland Feb 7 '14 at 18:08
    
Let me reiterate: You don't need to split your datetimes and you shouldn't do it using pattern matching anyway. R comes with specific functions for dealing with datetimes and everything you want to do can be done easily using these functions and possibly one of the time series packages. – Roland Feb 7 '14 at 23:04
    
Roland, thanks for the input. I now understand why using regular expressions isn't the best. I converted my datetime to POSIXct and now am trying to figure out how to: (1) subset out only the "daytime" observations, i.e. between 7:00 and 21:00 (2) subset/split data into 5 and 15 minute intervals. This doesn't really fit within the context of my original question so I will probably make another post shortly. – stokeinfo Feb 10 '14 at 22:30

You can just used vectorized boolean comparisons...

all(paste(data2$dates, data2$times) == data2$datetime)

Should return TRUE if everything matches and FALSE otherwise. You could also wrap it in which and use != instead to see the rows where things don't match.

which(paste(data2$dates, data2$times) != data2$datetime)

Finally, I try to avoid regular expressions (and sub) whenever possible. Instead, I would use something like this:

splits <- strsplit(data2$datetime, ' ')
data2$dates <- sapply(splits, '[', 1)
data2$times <- sapply(splits, '[', 2)
share|improve this answer
    
Sweet, thanks! This is awesome. I guess there is really no need to loop over each row. – stokeinfo Feb 7 '14 at 18:21
    
@stokeinfo FWIW, there is almost never a need to loop over each row! – Justin Feb 7 '14 at 18:44

This will give the row numbers where the date and time do not match the datetime

with(data2, which(format(datetime) != paste(date, time)))

You might not need the format part but we can't tell since the data was not provided in a reproducible form in the question.

Also, consider whether you really need to split datetime up in the first place.

share|improve this answer
    
This solution scares me because it says that 413,000 observations don't match. Justin's solution above yielded a TRUE which would seem to indicate that everything is a-ok. Any thoughts on the discrepancies between the two solutions? – stokeinfo Feb 7 '14 at 18:31
1  
You really need to provide your data in reproducible form when asking questions on SO. Without that we are just guessing. For example the format may be producing a time zone? Try posting dput(head(data2)). Also the real solution, as mentioned, is likely that the datetime should not be split up in the first place. – G. Grothendieck Feb 7 '14 at 18:41
    
I'll second everything @G.Grothendieck said! until we know what your data really looks like, it is all a shot in the dark. – Justin Feb 7 '14 at 18:44
    
The data is too big for it to be appropriate to post to SO. Since I am a new SO user, I'll have to start a new question to continue troubleshooting. – stokeinfo Feb 7 '14 at 20:34
    
No its not. You already posted it. We are just asking you to post in reproducible form:dput(head(data2)). Also please justify why you need to split the datetime. – G. Grothendieck Feb 7 '14 at 20:44

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