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I am experimenting with different pandas-friendly storage schemes for tick data. The fastest (in terms of reading and writing) so far has been using an HDFStore with blosc compression and the "fixed" format.

store = pd.HDFStore(path, complevel=9, complib='blosc')
store.put(symbol, df)
store.close()

I'm indexing by ticker symbol since that is my common access pattern. However, this scheme adds about 1 MB of space per symbol. That is, if the data frame for an microcap stock contains just a thousand ticks for that day, the file will increase by a megabyte in size. So for a large universe of small stocks, the .h5 file quickly becomes unwieldy.

Is there a way to keep the performance benefits of blosc/fixed format but get the size down? I have tried the "table" format, which requires about 285 KB per symbol.

store.append(symbol, df, data_columns=True)

However, this format is dramatically slower to read and write.

In case it helps, here is what my data frame looks like:

exchtime     datetime64[ns]
localtime    datetime64[ns]
symbol               object
country               int64
exch                 object
currency              int64
indicator             int64
bid                 float64
bidsize               int64
bidexch              object
ask                 float64
asksize               int64
askexch              object

The blosc compression itself works pretty well since the resulting .h5 file requires only 30--35 bytes per row. So right now my main concern is decreasing the size penalty per node in HDFStore.

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1  
AFAIK their is a certain minimum for a block size in PyTables; you can have a look at various option to ptrepack the file. A 1MB minimum is prob reasonable IMHO. You can also try writing in the Table format, instead of setting all data_columns=True, just pass format='table'; it will write the table format (but you won't be able to query except by index); but it stores as a single block and so should be almost as fast as fixed (but somewhat more space efficient). – Jeff Feb 7 '14 at 18:46
    
@Jeff Any options in particular I should pass to ptrepack? If I don't give any options, the resulting file is the same size. – chrisaycock Feb 7 '14 at 18:59
1  
you can try chunkshape; I don't know if this will change the size though. – Jeff Feb 7 '14 at 19:06
    
@Jeff chunkshape=auto shrank the file! I'm going to experiment with this and see how it goes. – chrisaycock Feb 7 '14 at 20:35
    
really? that's great. FYI, their is a also a new blosc filter in PyTables 3.1 (just released), see here: pytables.github.io/release-notes/RELEASE_NOTES_v3.1.x.html; not sure what the updated blosc will do (I think that pandas will directly pass thru the argument, if it doesn't work, pls file a bug report - currently pandas doesn't validate the compressor) – Jeff Feb 7 '14 at 20:41
up vote 3 down vote accepted

AFAIK there is a certain minimum for a block size in PyTables.

Here are some suggestions:

  • You can ptrepack the file, using the option chunkshape='auto'. This will pack it using a chunkshape that is computed from looking at all the data and can repack the data in a more efficient blocksize resulting in smaller file sizes. The reason is that PyTables needs to be informed about the expected number of rows of the final array/table size.

  • You can achieve an optimal chunksize in a Table format by passing expectedrows= (and only doing a single append). However, ptrepacking will STILL have a benefit here.

  • You can also try writing in the Table format, instead of setting all data_columns=True, just pass format='table'; it will write the table format (but you won't be able to query except by index); but it stores as a single block and so should be almost as fast as fixed (but somewhat more space efficient)

  • In PyTables 3.1 (just released), there is a new blosc filter. Which might reduce file sizes. See here

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