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Is there any way to flip the relationship in a Django querset? Such as turning a Foo queryset into a Bar queryset if all Foo objects have a foreign key to Bar?

Take the following example:

#condition_n are previously defined statements that results in either True or False
if condition_1:
    foo_qs = Foo.objects.filter(bar__something=...)
    if condition_2:
        foo_qs = foo_qs.filter(bar__another_thing=...)
        if condition_3:
            #you get the point

now this will result in some queryset foo_qs depending on the evaluation of the condition_n type statements. If I wanted to also get the bar queryset that would result from that, I could do the following:

#condition_n are previously defined statements that results in either True or False
    if condition_1:
        foo_qs = Foo.objects.filter(bar__something=...)
        bar_qs = Bar.objects.filter(something=...)
        if condition_2:
            foo_qs = foo_qs.filter(bar__another_thing=...)
            bar_qs = Bar.objects.filter(another_thing=...)
            if condition_3:
                #you get the point

but ideally I would like to take any queryset, and give it the name of the foreign key ("bar" in this case), and have it flip to the equivalent queryset. Is there any way about doing this?

share|improve this question
    
I don't have time for a proper answer but - using Q objects you can do Q(**{'key': 'value'}). Key is simply a string so it's easy to manipulate – yuvi Feb 7 '14 at 19:11
    
please put some real code ... as well as what you expect back .... its not clear (at least not to me) what you are asking for (perhaps include a simplified bar/foo model class as well) – Joran Beasley Feb 7 '14 at 19:23
    
Why not construct the bar_qs queryset as above and then get the foo_qs queryset with Foo.objects.filter(bar__in=bar_qs)? – Kevin Christopher Henry Feb 7 '14 at 22:53
    
@KevinChristopherHenry Because the actual situation is significanly more complex where I can't actually just make the queryset for qs_bar easily – Ryan Saxe Feb 8 '14 at 3:18

Such as turning a Foo queryset into a Bar queryset if all Foo objects have a foreign key to Bar?

Why not? Here's one approach, if you always write the base query as the one local to the object in question.

bar_query = {
   'something': 'something',
}

def prefix_fk(query, prefix):
    prefixed_query = {}
    for key, value in query.items():
        prefixed_query[prefix+key] = value
    return prefixed_query

Foo.objects.filter(**prefix_fk(bar_query, 'bar__'))
Bar.objects.filter(**bar_query)

if condition_2:
    bar_query['another_query'] = 'foobar'
    Foo.objects.filter(**prefix_fk(bar_query, 'bar__'))
    Bar.objects.filter(**bar_query)
share|improve this answer
    
@RyanSaxe is this not the answer you're looking for? (and if so, why?) – yuvi Feb 8 '14 at 13:55

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