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So I have a code that I'm working on for a game. The game is irrelevant here, but here is the part of my code that produces the problem. In essence, I want the function to take input of the type of soldier, then substitute in the amount of each resource that it would take to build any given amount of that soldier. I have the latter part of the function written and working just fine, but it is the variable assignment that I am having trouble with.

 cost=function(troop,from,to){
    troop=c("phalanx","druidrider","pathfinder")
    if(troop=="phalanx"){
        w=100
        cl=130
        i=55
        cr=30
   } else if(troop=="druidrider"){
        w=360
        cl=330
        i=280
        cr=120
   } else if(troop=="pathfinder"){

And so on. I am wondering a few things: First, is there a more efficient way to do this? I want to be able to type in "cost(phalanx,30,50)" and it will automatically use the values I tried to assign to phalanx for the resources w,cl,i,cr, and substitute that into the rest of the equation. It gives me an error saying that

Warning message:
In if (troop == "phalanx") { :
 the condition has length > 1 and only the first element will be used

What am I doing wrong?

Thanks!

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1  
What programming language is this? (Also, are those +s at the beginning of the lines part of your code or Markdown gone wrong?) –  jwodder Feb 7 '14 at 19:33
    
What does troop=c("phalanx","druidrider","pathfinder") do? –  Peter de Rivaz Feb 7 '14 at 19:34
    
It is in R. I thought the troop=c("phalanx","druidrider","pathfinder") would get rid of the the error because it would say that "phalanx is undefined" The + signs are just at the beginning of my code when I copied and pasted –  user3084629 Feb 7 '14 at 19:35
    
It doesn't make any sense to make troop a parameter given to the function and then immediately overwrite whatever value might have been passed to troop. –  BondedDust Feb 7 '14 at 20:22

2 Answers 2

The warning is because troop is a vector with 3 elements, when you do the comparison: troop=="phalanx" it returns a logical vector with 3 values (TRUE, FALSE, FALSE). This is then passed to the if statement which is expecting a single logical value, but it receives 3, so it ignores the last 2 and executes the code based on the 1st value.

It is not clear what exactly you are trying to do here, but it may be simpler to create a list of lists with the values that you want, then you can access the sublists by name to get the set of values associated with that name.

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You're doing a mistake in your function. You may not reassign troop.

cost=function(troop,from,to){
    #troop=c("phalanx","druidrider","pathfinder")
    if(troop=="phalanx"){
        w=100
        cl=130
        i=55
        cr=30
     } else if(troop=="druidrider"){
        w=360
        cl=330
        i=280
        cr=120
     } else if(troop=="pathfinder"){

Just let out that troop = part. If you have it in, troop is a vector, and then if does not know to which element of the vector it shall compare to. Written out if(troop=="phalanx") in your code is if(c("phalanx","druidrider","pathfinder") == "phalanx") which doesn't make sense (as it gives a boolean vector TRUE, FALSE, FALSE and only the first TRUE is used.

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