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The RFC 3986 URI: Generic Syntax spec lists a semicolon as a reserved (sub-delim) character:

reserved    = gen-delims / sub-delims

gen-delims  = ":" / "/" / "?" / "#" / "[" / "]" / "@"

sub-delims  = "!" / "$" / "&" / "'" / "(" / ")"
              / "*" / "+" / "," / ";" / "="

What is the reserved purpose of the ";" of the semicolon in URIs? For that matter, what is the purpose of the other sub-delims (I'm only aware of purposes for "&", "+", and "=")?

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up vote 29 down vote accepted

There is an explanation at the end of section 3.3.

Aside from dot-segments in hierarchical paths, a path segment is considered opaque by the generic syntax. URI producing applications often use the reserved characters allowed in a segment to delimit scheme-specific or dereference-handler-specific subcomponents. For example, the semicolon (";") and equals ("=") reserved characters are often used to delimit parameters and parameter values applicable to that segment. The comma (",") reserved character is often used for similar purposes. For example, one URI producer might use a segment such as "name;v=1.1" to indicate a reference to version 1.1 of "name", whereas another might use a segment such as "name,1.1" to indicate the same. Parameter types may be defined by scheme-specific semantics, but in most cases the syntax of a parameter is specific to the implementation of the URI's dereferencing algorithm.

In other words, it is reserved so that people who want a delimited list of something in the URL can safely use ; as a delimiter even if the parts contain ;, as long as the contents are percent-encoded. In other words, you can do this:

foo;bar;baz%3bqux

and interpret it as three parts: foo, bar, baz;qux. If semi-colon were not a reserved character, the ; and %3bwould be equivalent so the URI would be incorrectly interpreted as four parts: foo, bar, baz, qux.

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2  
In short, reserved, but for nothing in particular. We use it to encode some information in RESTful queries. – S.Lott Jan 29 '10 at 17:49
    
Thanks for the example, that really helps. – NickC Jan 29 '10 at 18:21
1  
Can somebody share an example of this used in real word web services? – Winny Jun 11 '14 at 14:46
    
Some special meaning for the ; in HTTP URLs? – Jaime Hablutzel Sep 25 '15 at 17:56

Section 3.3 covers this - it's an opaque delimiter a URI-producing application can use if convenient:

Aside from dot-segments in hierarchical paths, a path segment is considered opaque by the generic syntax. URI producing applications often use the reserved characters allowed in a segment to delimit scheme-specific or dereference-handler-specific subcomponents. For example, the semicolon (";") and equals ("=") reserved characters are often used to delimit parameters and parameter values applicable to that segment. The comma (",") reserved character is often used for similar purposes. For example, one URI producer might use a segment such as "name;v=1.1" to indicate a reference to version 1.1 of "name", whereas another might use a segment such as "name,1.1" to indicate the same. Parameter types may be defined by scheme-specific semantics, but in most cases the syntax of a parameter is specific to the implementation of the URI's dereferencing algorithm.

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There are some conventions around its current usage that are interesting. These speak to when to use a semicolon or comma. From the book "RESTful Web Services":

Use punctuation characters to separate multiple pieces of data at the same level of hierarchy. Use commas when the order of the items matters, ... Use semicolons when the order doesn't matter.

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The intent is clearer if you go back to older versions of the specification:

  path_segments = segment *( "/" segment )
  segment       = *pchar *( ";" param ) 

Each path segment may include a sequence of parameters, indicated by the semicolon ";" character.

I believe it has its origins in FTP URIs.

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Since 2014 path segments are known to contribute to Reflected File Download attacks. Let's assume we have a vulnerable API that reflects whatever we send to it (the URL was real apparently, now fixed):

https://google.com/s?q=rfd%22||calc||

{"results":["q", "rfd\"||calc||","I love rfd"]}

Now, this is harmless in a browser as it's JSON so it's not going to be rendered but the browser will rather offer to download the response as a file. Now here's the path segments come to help (for the attacker):

https://google.com/s;/setup.bat;?q=rfd%22||calc||

Everything between semicolons (;/setup.bat;) will be not sent to the web service, but instead the browser will interpret it as the file name... to save the API response. Now, a file called setup.bat will be downloaded and run without asking about dangers of running files downloaded from Internet (because it contains the word "setup" in its name). The contents will be interpreted as Windows batch file, and the calc.exe command will be run.

Prevention:

  • sanitize your API's input (in this case they should just allow alphanumerics); escaping is not sufficient
  • add Content-Disposition: attachment; filename="whatever.txt" on APIs that are not going to be rendered; Google was missing the filename part which actually made the attack easier
  • add X-Content-Type-Options: nosniff header to API responses
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1  
While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. – Gottlieb Notschnabel Oct 22 '14 at 2:51
1  
Good point, done. – kravietz Oct 22 '14 at 9:43

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