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I have 3 classes, like below. I've used synchronized(b) so, A object gets the lock on the B object and none of the methods in b will be called until foo method in A finishes off the work.

But, this seems to not work(see the output at the end). In-fact the racethread was able to call methods on the object b.

Note: You can create a simple java project and add the below code in one file to try and execute.

package com.threads.main.deadlock;

class A {
    void foo(B b) {
        synchronized (b) { // Trying to get lock on b here
            String name = Thread.currentThread().getName();
            System.out.println(name + " entered A.foo");
            try {
                Thread.sleep(1000);
            } catch (Exception e) {
                System.out.println("A Interrupted");
            }
            System.out.println(name + " trying to call B.last()");
            b.last();
        }
    }

    synchronized void last() {
        System.out.println("Inside A.last");
    }
}
class B {
    void bar(A a) {
        synchronized (a) {

            String name = Thread.currentThread().getName();
            System.out.println(name + " entered B.bar");
            try {
                Thread.sleep(1000);
            } catch (Exception e) {
                System.out.println("B Interrupted");
            }
            System.out.println(name + " trying to call A.last()");
            a.last();
        }
    }

    synchronized void last() {
        System.out.println("Inside B.last");
    }
}
public class Deadlock implements Runnable {
    A a = new A();
    B b = new B();

    Deadlock() {
        Thread.currentThread().setName("MainThread");
        Thread t = new Thread(this, "RacingThread");
        t.start();

        new Thread(new Dum(a)).start();
        a.foo(b); // get lock on a in this thread.
        System.out.println("Back in main thread");
    }

    public void run() {
        b.bar(a); // get lock on b in other thread.
        System.out.println("Back in other thread");
    }

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        new Deadlock();
    }
}

class Dum implements Runnable {

    A a = null;

    public Dum(A a) {
        this.a = a;
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {
        int i =0; 
        while (i++ < 5) {
            System.out.println("Trying a.last .. dum");
            a.last();
        }
    }

}

output:

RacingThread entered B.bar
Trying a.last .. dum
MainThread entered A.foo
RacingThread trying to call A.last()
MainThread trying to call B.last()
Inside B.last
Inside A.last
Back in other thread
Back in main thread
Inside A.last
Trying a.last .. dum
Inside A.last
Trying a.last .. dum
Inside A.last
Trying a.last .. dum
Inside A.last
Trying a.last .. dum
Inside A.last
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It's really unclear what you expect here; there's nothing that would cause a deadlock. –  Brian Roach Feb 7 at 22:39
2  
Probably another case of misunderstanding that 2 threads need to synchronize on the same object monitor to be synchronized, and there's no way to "lock an object". –  Kayaman Feb 7 at 22:40
    
@Kayaman, could you please eloborate on '2 threads need to sync on the same object monitor to be synchronized' could you please modify the class and show it. It hard to understand as i'm new to multithreading. Also, the next point when I add synchronize(object) the object will be locked by the thread which just entered the object monitor; and none of the method within the locked object will be accessible to the other threads until the thread releases the monitor? –  Zeus Feb 7 at 22:52
    
@BrianRoach i'm expecting the foo() object to complete executing while keeping the methods on B locked, after i'm done executing foo(), the other threads can call the methods on object B. But, I am not able to hold the lock on object B as per the output statements i've printed in the console. –  Zeus Feb 7 at 22:58
    
What you describe is exactly what happened. You sync'd on the instance of A, slept for a second, called a.last() then released. While that was happening your Dum runnable was blocking on a.last() –  Brian Roach Feb 7 at 23:08

1 Answer 1

Your A and B thread uses different Object for synchronization in their methods.

So your assumption

A object gets the lock on the B object and none of the methods in b will be called until foo method in A finishes off the work.

is false. When A.foo is running, it uses the instance of B for synchronization. This however prevents only the parallel running of B.last, since B.foo has a synchronization block on A. BUT of course when A.foo tries to call b.last, it will not cause any blocking, since A.foo is already inside the monitor of b.

If you have a method like this:

synchronized void last() {
}

This is basicly equivalent to:

void last() {
   synchronized(this){ //so in case of Class B it means: this = the B instance
   }
}

I recommend to name all of your threads, and add Thread.currentThread().getName() to every single system out, and you will understand it better.

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