Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is what a.py looks

import sys


def test_import(another_python_file):
    import another_python_file as b
    b.run_me()

if __name__ == '__main__':
    print sys.argv
    test_import(sys.argv[1].strip())

this is what b.py looks

def run_me():
    print 'I am script b'

When I run, I get

$ python a.py b.py
['a.py', 'b.py']
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "a.py", line 10, in <module>
    test_import(sys.argv[1].strip())
  File "a.py", line 5, in test_import
    import another_python_file as b
ImportError: No module named another_python_file

What I need? I would expect it to import b.py and print I am script b

What am I missing?

share|improve this question
    
Possible duplicate –  msvalkon Feb 7 at 23:54

2 Answers 2

a.py:

import os
import sys


def test_import(another_python_file):
    b = __import__(another_python_file)
    b.run_me()

if __name__ == '__main__':
    print sys.argv
    test_import(sys.argv[1].strip('.py'))

b.py
def run_me():
    print 'I am script b'

$ python a.py b.py
['a.py', 'b.py']
I am script b

I was able to do that referring to http://www.diveintopython.net/functional_programming/dynamic_import.html

share|improve this answer

If you don't need flexibility, you can simply use __import__('module_name'). If you need advanced features like cache control, module searching or reloading, use the imp module.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.