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I'm struggling a bit with the dplyr-syntax. I have a data frame with different variables and one grouping variable. Now I want to calculate the mean for each column within each group, using dplyr in R.

df <- data.frame(a=sample(1:5, 10, replace=T), 
             b=sample(1:5, 10, replace=T), 
             c=sample(1:5, 10, replace=T), 
             d=sample(1:5, 10, replace=T), 
             grp=sample(1:3, 10, replace=T))
df %.% group_by(grp) %.% summarise(mean(a))

This gives me the mean for column "a" for each group indicated by "grp".

My question is: is it possible to get the means for each column within each group at once? Or do I have to repeat df %.% group_by(grp) %.% summarise(mean(a)) for each column?

What I would like to have is something like

df %.% group_by(grp) %.% summarise(mean(a:d)) # "mean(a:d)" does not work

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

dplyr 0.2 contains summarise_each for this aim:

df %>% group_by(grp) %>% summarise_each(funs(mean))
#> Source: local data frame [3 x 5]
#> 
#>   grp    a    b    c    d
#> 1   1 3.00 1.67 3.67 2.00
#> 2   2 2.25 3.00 3.75 3.00
#> 3   3 3.00 2.33 2.67 1.67
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You can simply pass more arguments to summarise:

df %.% group_by(grp) %.% summarise(mean(a), mean(b), mean(c), mean(d))

Source: local data frame [3 x 5]

  grp  mean(a)  mean(b)  mean(c) mean(d)
1   1 2.500000 3.500000 2.000000     3.0
2   2 3.800000 3.200000 3.200000     2.8
3   3 3.666667 3.333333 2.333333     3.0
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1  
Great! Is it even possible to do such things if column names and count are unknown? E.g. having 3 or 6 instead of 4 fixed columns? –  Daniel Lüdecke Feb 8 at 11:00
2  
That is a TODO in dplyr I believe (like plyr colwise), see here for a rather awkward current solution: stackoverflow.com/a/21296364/1527403 –  Stephen Henderson Feb 8 at 11:55
    
Thanks a lot to both of you! I'll probably just use a loop to iterate all columns. –  Daniel Lüdecke Feb 8 at 16:09
2  
dplyr now has summarise_each which will operate on each column –  rrs Jun 18 at 15:39

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