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I need to debug a program that includes forall blocks. Inside of them are pure subroutines or functions. In order to temporarily disable the pure predicate I use the C precompiler as in the following question posed by me:

Gfortran: Treat pure functions as normal functions for debugging purposes?

The problem now is, that if the subroutines or functions inside the forall block are not pure I get an error compiling. Is there a possibility to treat these errors

Error: Reference to non-PURE function 'pvkp' at (1) inside a FORALL block

only as warnings or is there maybe an easy possibility to use the C precompiler for turning

forall (i=1:n)
   ...
end forall

into

do i=1,n
   ...
end do 

Any ideas are appreciated!

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3  
Given that forall doesn't do what it was supposed to do (and also this one), why not just replace all forall with do anyway? –  Kyle Kanos Feb 8 at 18:36
    
I completely understand the concept of forall. I believe that the forall blocks will actually improve the speed of my program (once it is debugged). –  Wauzl Feb 8 at 20:28
    
I hope you plan on testing your assertion and not running with it purely on belief. In any event, you may want to check your assembler output to ensure that it is indeed using forall and not just transforming it into do...enddo. –  Kyle Kanos Feb 8 at 20:36
    
I second Kyle's comment. forall probably won't speed-up your code, they only make it shorter. Compilers are very good at optimizing do-loops and forall is sometimes too difficult to do without a temporary array. –  Vladimir F Feb 8 at 20:51
    
There are some situations like forall (i=1:3) A(i,i) = 1.0 end forall where a do loop would be optimized by the compiler as good as the forall assignment. But I have some other cases, where I use pure functions that actually do more complicated stuff. Of course, forall is just an array definition and that’s how I use it. There is this construct for this task, so why not use it? Can you give me a hint on how to check how the blocks in question are optimized? –  Wauzl Feb 8 at 21:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

One simplification is to use a do concurrent loop instead of a forall block. This reduces the number of linked changes required in the code: one need only change the loop specification, not change an end forall to an end do.

An approach not to be proud of, using cpp, and suitable for only simple cases:

#ifdef DEBUG
#define conloop(var, lower, upper) do var=lower, upper
#else
#define conloop(var, lower, upper) do concurrent (var=lower:upper)
#endif

  conloop(i,1,n)  ! Either a DO or DO CONCURRENT depending on DEBUG
  ...
  end do
end

The above does have the obvious extension to using a forall construct (with the extra #define for the ending) if that is really what you want. Alternatively, although more tedious to produce, using such things as

#ifdef DEBUG
do i=1,n
#else
forall (i=1:n)
#endif
  ...
#ifdef DEBUG
end do
#else
end forall
#end

This is horrible, but I imagine that's true for all pre-processor approaches. It does allow more complicated masks and is more localized.

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And as Kyle Kanos says, one gets readable code by just sticking with do except in the rare cases where the compiler doesn't do a good job. –  francescalus Feb 8 at 18:50
    
I ended up defining a conloop and an endconloop. –  Wauzl Feb 10 at 8:47

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