Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was in an interview yesterday and asked to write a function to compare two strings, basically the same output as strcmp(). I wrote the following program and compare() function but was told wrong. The interviewer said, "You compare the strings from lower bytes to higher bytes. If it happens that string1 has smaller lower bytes but larger higher bytes, your code will output string1 is smaller than string 2 which is wrong. "

I thought when we do string comparison, we compare two strings from left to right and compare each pair of corresponding characters with their ASCII values. I've also found some source codes of strcmp() and tried a lot of cases to compare my results with those of strcmp(), so I think the program is right.

I've put my program written in the interview here. To compare, I've printed both the values of the function I wrote and strcmp(). I have to say it's not very concise.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

int compare (char *string1, char *string2, int length1, int length2);

int main()
{

 int len1,len2;
 char *str1;
 char *str2;
 int result;
 int result1;

//Input the string1
 printf("Please input the length of string1\n");
 scanf("%d", &len1);
 str1=malloc(sizeof(char)*len1);
 printf("Please input string 1:\n");
 scanf("%s",str1);

//Input the string2
 printf("Please input the length of string2\n");
 scanf("%d", &len2);
 str2=malloc(sizeof(char)*len2);
 printf("Please input string 2:\n");
 scanf("%s",str2);

//Do comparison, Both compare() and strcmp() are used
 result=compare(str1,str2,len1,len2);
 result1=strcmp(str1,str2);
 printf("\nThe result of compare() is: %d\n",result);
 printf("The result of strcmp() is:%d\n",result1);


 return 0;
}



int compare (char *string1, char *string2,int length1, int length2)
//If string1>string2, return1; if string1<string2, return -1; if string1=string2, return 0
{
 int result=0;

// Use the shorter length to do comprison bit by bit
 int length=(length1>length2)?length2:length1;


 for(int i=0;i<length-1;i++)
 {
  if(string1[i]>string2[i])
  {
   result=1;
   printf("%d\n",result);
   break;
  }
  else if (string1[i]<string2[i])
  {
   result=-1;
   printf("%d\n",result);
   break;
  }

 }


  if(result==1)
  {
   return 1;
  }
  else if (result==-1)
  {
   return -1;
  }
  else if (length1>length2)
  {
   return 1;
  }
  else if (length1<length2)
  {
   return -1;
  }
  else
  {
   return 0;
  }

}

So can anyone tell me what is wrong in the program? Can you give me an example that the results of compare() and strcmp() are not the same?

Thanks!

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

you are passing wrong strings length or either memory allocations for str1 and str2 is wrong that causes undefined behaviour in scanf.

for example memory allocation is:

str2 = malloc(sizeof(char) * len2); 

then only len2 chars can be in array str2 (including nul char) and string length can be len2 - 1.

I would suggest do something like(read comments):

int max_lenght = 128;  // defined a constant  
str1 = malloc(max_lenght);
printf("Please input string 1:\n");
fgets(str1, max_lenght, stdin);
len1 = strlen(str1); // calculate length 

You don't need to check result value that if it is equals to -1 return -1, if 0 then return 0 ... Just do like:

int result=0, i;  // result is 0 
for(i=0; i < length-1; i++)
{
  if(string1[i] > string2[i])
  {
       result = 1; // result is 1
       break;
  }
  else if (string1[i] < string2[i])
  {
       result = -1; // result -1
       break;
  }
}
return result;  // return what is result is 
  // comparison like if(result == -1) return -1 not needed 

in-fact further simple as:

for(result=0, i=0; i < length-1; i++){
   if(string1[i] == string2[i])
       continue;  // just continue until equal 
   if(string1[i] > string2[i])
       result = 1;
   else
       result = -1;
   break;  // else break 
}
return result;
share|improve this answer
    
So you mean I've forgotten the memory for '\0', right? –  Michael Feb 8 '14 at 16:47
    
@Michael if you inputs len2 number of chars then calling scanf will causes undefined behaviour (and strcmp too) –  Grijesh Chauhan Feb 8 '14 at 16:48
    
Could you explain a little why it's undefined behavior? How should I input a string correctly? I also used gets() to input strings. But what I know is gets() is not good because gets() doesn't check whether there is enough memory. –  Michael Feb 8 '14 at 16:51
1  
@Michael like gets buffer-overflow problem is also with scanf better is to use fgets() to avoid buffer overflow. you should allocate memory = number of chars + 1 for \0. then use fgets ( str1, len1, stdin); and pass strlen(str1) value to compare function. –  Grijesh Chauhan Feb 8 '14 at 16:55
    
Got it. Thank you! Do you think my string comparison algorithm is wrong? I think it's right. –  Michael Feb 8 '14 at 16:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.