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This has to be easy, but I can't see it. Need another (smarter) pair of eyes.

This works:

$('#topmenu li').hover(
    function(){
        $this = $(this);
        alert( $this.attr('id') );
    }
);

And this works:

$('#topmenu li').hover(
    function(){
        $this = $(this);
        setTimeout(function($this){
            alert( 'hello' );
        },800);
    }
);

But this does not work:

$('#topmenu li').hover(
    function(){
        $this = $(this);
        setTimeout(function($this){
            alert( $this.attr('id') );
        },800);
    }
);

What am I missing??

share|improve this question
    
try setTimeout(function(){ alert( $this.attr('id') ); },800); –  Satpal Feb 8 at 16:49
    
what is the html ? –  Istiaque Ahmed Feb 8 at 16:52

3 Answers 3

Remove $this from setTimeout callback function

$('#topmenu li').hover(
    function(){
        var $this = $(this);
        setTimeout(function(){
            alert( $this.attr('id') );
        },800);
    }
);

Fiddle Demo

share|improve this answer

The problem is that adding a parameter to the function creates a local variable in its private scope, which is likely to mask other variables with the same name in one of the parents scopes.

Without a parameter :

var $this = 1;
function f() {
    return $this;
}
f(); // 1

With a parameter :

var $this = 1;
function f($this) {
    return $this;
}
f(); // undefined
f(2); // 2
$this; // 1

In the first case, there is no $this variable in the function's scope, so, the globally defined $this variable is returned. In the second case, f() returns undefined because $this exists locally, but is set to undefined by default, while f(2) returns 2 because the local $this is set to 2.

Regarding your own situation, $this.attr('id') will crash because $this is not defined. You have to replace setTimeout(function($this){ with setTimeout(function(){ in order to retrieve the outer variable.

share|improve this answer
    
I appreciate the explanation (very much) but I don't understand this point: why is $this (a jQuery object) available inside the function without it being passed INTO the function? It isn't a global...? Also, how WOULD one pass the jQuery object into the function? Or is the answer because the 2nd function is inside the 1st function? –  gibberish Feb 9 at 2:42
    
@gibberish Right, the inner function inherits from the scope of the outer function (from all surrounding scopes actually, including the global scope). So, there is no need to pass the variable to the inner function since it's already available in the outer function. This is what my first code block tells. For that matter, you should make some experiments around this topic into your browser console (F12 > copy-paste > ENTER). Here is an article which might be a better help, hopefully : adequatelygood.com/JavaScript-Scoping-and-Hoisting.html. –  procrastinator Feb 9 at 8:08

You don't need to pass $this as paramter in setTimeout function

$('#topmenu li').hover(
    function(){
        $this = $(this);
        setTimeout(function(){
            alert( $this.attr('id') );
        },800);
    }
);

DEMO

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for this answer -- it was correct (as you knew before I did) -- but I don't understand this point: why is $this (a jQuery object) available inside the function without it being passed INTO the function? It isn't a global...? Also, how WOULD one pass the jQuery object into the function? Or is the answer because the 2nd function is inside the 1st function? –  gibberish Feb 9 at 2:43

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