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this is an exercise from the OpenMP website: https://computing.llnl.gov/tutorials/openMP/exercise.html


#include "stdafx.h"
#include <omp.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
int nthreads, i, tid;
float total;

/*** Spawn parallel region ***/
#pragma omp parallel private(i, tid) // i changed this line 
  {
  /* Obtain thread number */
  tid = omp_get_thread_num();
  /* Only master thread does this */
  if (tid == 0) {
    nthreads = omp_get_num_threads();
    printf("Number of threads = %d\n", nthreads);
    }
  printf("Thread %d is starting...\n",tid);

  #pragma omp barrier

  /* do some work */
  total = 0.0;
  #pragma omp for schedule(dynamic,10) 
  for (i=0; i<1000000; i++)
     total = total + i*1.0;

  printf ("Thread %d is done! Total= %e\n",tid,total);

  } 
}

the output for this is

Number of threads = 4
Thread 0 is starting...
Thread 3 is starting...
Thread 2 is starting...
Thread 1 is starting...
Thread 0 is done! Total= 0.000000e+000
Thread 3 is done! Total= 0.000000e+000
Thread 2 is done! Total= 0.000000e+000
Thread 1 is done! Total= 0.000000e+000

which means we have a problem with the variable "total"

this is the help on the site enter image description here

Here is my Solution: do you think this is the correct way to do it?

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <omp.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
int nthreads, i, tid;
float total;

/*** Spawn parallel region ***/
#pragma omp parallel private(total,tid)
  {
  /* Obtain thread number */
  tid = omp_get_thread_num();
  total= 0.0;
  /* Only master thread does this */
  if (tid == 0) {
    nthreads = omp_get_num_threads();
    printf("Number of threads = %d\n", nthreads);
    }
  printf("Thread %d is starting...\n",tid);



  #pragma omp parallel for schedule(static,10)\
  private(i)\
  reduction(+:total)
  for (i=0; i<1000000; i++) 
     total = total + i*1.0;

  printf ("Thread %d is done! Total= %e\n",tid,total);

  } /*** End of parallel region ***/
}

Here is my new output:

Number of threads = 4
Thread 0 is starting...
Thread 1 is starting...
Thread 0 is done! Total= 4.999404e+011
Thread 2 is starting...
Thread 1 is done! Total= 4.999404e+011
Thread 2 is done! Total= 4.999404e+011
Thread 3 is starting...
Thread 3 is done! Total= 4.999404e+011
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes you certainly want total to be a thread-private variable. One thing you presumably would do in a real example is to reduce the thread-private totals to a single global total at the end (and only let one thread print the result then). One way to do that is a simple

#pragma omp atomic
global_total += total

at the end (there are better ways though using reductions).

PS: Loop counters for omp for are by default private, so you actually don't have to explicitly specify that.

share|improve this answer
    
can you look at my edit ? is this what you had in mind? –  Gilad Feb 8 at 18:47
    
Using reduction is the idiomatic way to go (although it's useful to write the simple version with private variables and atomic adds just to understand how it works in the background). But you shouldn't make total private in this case, it should be shared. –  Voo Feb 8 at 20:03
    
why do u think total should be shared and not private? –  Gilad Feb 8 at 22:09
    
@Androidy Think about how you'd implement the reduction manually: You have one private variable for each thread and sum into that one. At the end you then have to get the total sum of all those partial sums, which is easiest done by just adding everything into one shared variable atomically. Or think about it another way: There is logically only one global sum, having n copies of it doesn't make much sense. –  Voo Feb 8 at 22:55
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