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I am trying to write a code which checks whether a number is binary or not. Here is my code.

declare
n INTEGER:=#
ch number:=0;

begin
loop
exit when n=0;
if(mod(n,10)!=0 or mod(n,10)!=1) then
ch:=1;
exit;
end if;
n:=n/10;
end loop;
if ch=1 then
dbms_output.put_line('Not a Binary number.');
else
dbms_output.put_line('Binary!!!');
end if;
end;
/

I am using Oracle 11g SQL Plus. Sometimes it is giving error at line 2. Here is the snippet of error.

old   2: n INTEGER:=#
new   2: n INTEGER:=;
n INTEGER:=;
           *
ERROR at line 2:
ORA-06550: line 2, column 12:
PLS-00103: Encountered the symbol ";" when expecting one of the following:
( - + case mod new not null <an identifier>

And if it is running correctly then for every number it is giving the same output as 'Not a Binary number.'.

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1  
mod(n,10)!=0 or mod(n,10)!=1 is always TRUE –  Egor Skriptunoff Feb 8 at 19:39
1  
You can rewrite your program much simpler: if regexp_like(to_char(n), '^[01]+$') then –  Egor Skriptunoff Feb 8 at 19:45
    
@EgorSkriptunoff Can you please explain ^[01]+$ part? –  Maverick Feb 8 at 20:54
1  
'^' anchors the expression to the start of the data. '[01]' is a character class consisting of only the characters '0' and '1'. '+' means "one or more repetitions of the preceding element" (the character class). '$' anchors to the end of the data. Thus, it says that all characters between the start and the end must be either '0' or '1', or in other words valid binary digits; thus, the expression tests for a string representing a binary number. See the Oracle regular expression docs. Share and enjoy. –  Bob Jarvis Feb 8 at 21:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Change the OR by AND in the IF statement. It seems to do what you want.

DECLARE
  n  INTEGER := &num;
  ch NUMBER := 0;

BEGIN
  LOOP
    EXIT WHEN n = 0;
    IF MOD(n, 10) != 0
       AND MOD(n, 10) != 1
    THEN
      ch := 1;
      EXIT;
    END IF;
    n := n / 10;
  END LOOP;
  IF ch = 1
  THEN
    dbms_output.put_line('Not a Binary number.');
  ELSE
    dbms_output.put_line('Binary!!!');
  END IF;
END;
/
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