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I have a really large loop in my program, and I use a lot of temporary and instance variables. As my loop keeps running, the program uses up more and more memory until it crashes. Can I get some advice on how to do correct memory management in this situation? My main question is, why is the following code wrong?

Here is the code that is causing the leak:

(void) processTrackValues:(NSMutableArray*) tags {
NSImage* trackArt = [tags objectAtIndex:5];
NSMutableArray* tempArtArray = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
[tempArtArray addObject:trackArt];
[tempArtArray release];
}

I also tried:

(void) processTrackValues:(NSMutableArray*) tags {
NSImage* trackArt = [tags objectAtIndex:5];
NSMutableArray* tempArtArray = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
[tempArtArray addObject:trackArt];
[trackArt release];
[tempArtArray release];
}

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Code would help. –  Marc W Jan 29 '10 at 20:58
    
There's a LOT of code. I don't know how to make this question more specific :/ –  Chetan Jan 29 '10 at 21:00
    
doesn't objective C have a garbage collector? –  Chris H Jan 29 '10 at 21:01
    
It's not as good as the Java garbage collector. You can't count on it to protect you in situations like this one. If you're getting crashes from memory overflows then you need to manage it yourself. –  Marc W Jan 29 '10 at 21:02
    
Depending on what's causing it, the java collector won't save you either. You can only collect what isn't being referenced, after all. –  mbarnett Jan 29 '10 at 21:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Adam's answer is correct. In pseudo code:

unsigned int iters = 0;
NSAutoreleasePool *p = nil;
while(1) {
  if (!p) p = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];
  ... do stuff here ...
  if ( iters == 1000) {
     iters = 0;
     [p drain];
     p = nil;
  }
}

Re-using temporary objects is generally a waste of time and rife with fragility.

Frankly, you should probably just do the autorelease pool dance once per every iteration through the loop and ignore any silly counters and the like until you have instrumented proof that there is overhead otherwise.

Something like:

NSAutoreleasePool *p = nil;
while(1) {
  p = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];
  ... do stuff here ...
  [p drain];
}
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@bbum, a while back Mike Ash did some investigation and found that draining the pool every iteration was most efficient. I think that was recent enough to include the x86_64/ARM runtime, but can't drag up a reference right now. –  user23743 Jan 29 '10 at 21:15
    
Would this work to release objects allocated by functions called under ... do stuff here ...? Or do those functions need their own autoreleasepools? –  Chetan Jan 29 '10 at 21:27
    
@Chetan: Autorelease pools are pushed onto a stack of pools when they are created. When you you call [obj autorelease], the object is put onto the pool at the top of the stack. So objects created in functions under ... do stuff here... will be autorelease'd onto the pool at the top of the stack. –  mipadi Jan 29 '10 at 22:01
    
@graham I probably should have gone with that pattern. It really boils down to measure, measure, measure. –  bbum Jan 30 '10 at 8:42

You could try to reuse your temporary objects or set up your own AutoReleasePool for those objects and release it every 1000 iterations or so.

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