Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

I was looking through the solutions of a problem on Topcoder, and came across this one:

http://community.topcoder.com/stat?c=problem_solution&rm=249419&rd=9996&pm=6621&cr=309453

At present I am not interested to know how the algorithm works, but what's the usage of "< ?=" operator in the code? I tried compiling the code on my machine, and also on ideone.com, but to my surprise, the code fails to compile. What does the operator do, and why doesn't it work on standard compilers like ideone, and the code passes system tests on Topcoder?

The code is here:

using namespace std;

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>
#include <ctype.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <string>
#include <sstream>
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <queue>
#include <stack>
#include <set>
#include <map>
#include <algorithm>
#include <functional>

#define PB push_back
#define SZ size()
#define REP(v, hi) for (int v=0; v<(hi); v++)
#define REPD(v, hi) for (int v=((hi)-1); v>=0; v--)
#define FOR(v, lo, hi) for (int v=(lo); v<(hi); v++)
#define FORD(v, lo, hi) for (int v=((hi)-1); v>=(lo); v--)

typedef vector <int> VI;
typedef vector <VI> VVI;
typedef vector <VVI> VVVI;

/* ############################ THE REAL CODE ############################ */

class RoboRace {
  public:
  int startTime(vector <string> m, vector <string> _c) {
    string c;
    REP(i,_c.SZ) c+=_c[i];
    int N=c.SZ;
    int Y=m.SZ, X=m[0].SZ;
    VVVI best(Y, VVI(X, VI(N+1, 99999)));
    int ey=-1,ex=-1;
    int yy=-1,yx=-1;
    int fy=-1,fx=-1;
    REP(y,Y) REP(x,X) {
      if (m[y][x]=='Y') { yy=y; yx=x; m[y][x]='.'; }
      if (m[y][x]=='F') { fy=y; fx=x; m[y][x]='.'; }
      if (m[y][x]=='X') { ey=y; ex=x; m[y][x]='.'; }
    }
    REP(n,N+1) best[ey][ex][n]=n;
    REPD(n,N) REP(y,Y) REP(x,X) {
      if (m[y][x]=='#') continue;
      best[y][x][n] <?= best[y][x][n+1];
      if (c[n]=='N' && y>0)   best[y][x][n] <?= best[y-1][x][n+1];
      if (c[n]=='S' && y<Y-1) best[y][x][n] <?= best[y+1][x][n+1];
      if (c[n]=='W' && x>0)   best[y][x][n] <?= best[y][x-1][n+1];
      if (c[n]=='E' && x<X-1) best[y][x][n] <?= best[y][x+1][n+1];
    }

    REP(n,N) if (best[yy][yx][n] < best[fy][fx][n]) return n;
    return -1;
  }
};
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by πάντα ῥεῖ, chris, Yakk, Josh Mein, Blastfurnace Feb 9 '14 at 0:28

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
WTH should the c++<?= operator be?? Never heard about that one ... –  πάντα ῥεῖ Feb 8 '14 at 21:04
    
@πάνταῥεῖ i am not sure its an operator, but it seemed more of a operator for a novice like me, similar to the "+=" operator. –  shivshnkr Feb 8 '14 at 21:06
    
As jrok's answer sounds for me you'd be better off not using this! –  πάντα ῥεῖ Feb 8 '14 at 21:08
    
i don't understand why i get -ve votes for my not knowing something!! –  shivshnkr Feb 8 '14 at 21:08
1  
The whole code is a bunch of wtf's :) –  jrok Feb 8 '14 at 21:10

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

That's a gcc extension, compound minimum operator, a binary operator that assign the minimum of its operands to the left-hand operand. It's mentioned in the deprecated features list of gcc manual.

A <?= B means assign the minimum of A and B to A.

There are (were) also

<?     minimum operator
>?     maximum operator
>?=    compound form of maximum operator

Sane code nowadays would use std::min instead.

share|improve this answer
    
but why doesn't this code compile on my machine or ideone.com, though it passes system tests? –  shivshnkr Feb 8 '14 at 21:13
    
@shivshnkr, It's a deprecated GCC extension. –  chris Feb 8 '14 at 21:13
    
@chris it means none but topcoder still supports deprecated things? –  shivshnkr Feb 8 '14 at 21:19
    
@shivshnkr, I suppose so. –  chris Feb 8 '14 at 21:21

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.