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I am trying to find all permutations where n balls are spread into m buckets. I am approaching it through recursion but I am confused on what I should recurse n on since n could decrease by any numbers... (I am recursing on m-1) Any thoughts on how to do this with a functional language approach?

There's a solution in C++ but I don't understand C++. List of combinations of N balls in M boxes in C++

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closed as too broad by Eran, Lajos Veres, Gordon Gustafson, Eric, lpapp Apr 14 '14 at 0:29

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
2 question: 1. do you care the order of the balls within one busket?; 2. are those buckets numbered? i.e., do you care the order of the buckets? –  Jackson Tale Feb 8 '14 at 22:22
    
I don't care the order of the balls within one bucket. And yes, I care the order of the buckets. –  kikilala Feb 8 '14 at 22:44
    
An example of the function ball 1 2 will return [[0;1];[1;0]], ball 5 1 will return [[5]] –  kikilala Feb 8 '14 at 22:46
    
Why close this question, guys? –  Jackson Tale Feb 8 '14 at 23:30
    
I answered your question, if you think it is helpful, please mark my answer correct –  Jackson Tale Feb 8 '14 at 23:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There is no need to generate redundant results. The following code is a bit ugly, but it does the job :

let ( <|> ) s e = 
  let rec aux s e res = 
    if e - s < 0 then res
    else aux (s + 1) e (s :: res) in
  List.rev (aux s e [])

let rec generate n m =
  let prepend_x l x = List.map (fun u -> x::u) l in
  if m = 1 then [[n]] 
  else
    let l = List.map (fun p -> prepend_x (generate (n - p) (m - 1)) p) (0 <|> n) in
    List.concat l

The idea is simply that you want all lists of the form p::u with u in generate (n - p) (m - 1), with p ranging over 0..n

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Yeah, i thought so too, just in this way it is hard to make it tail-recursive –  Jackson Tale Feb 10 '14 at 11:22
    
Tail recursion wouldn't really bring any benefit here (the call tree is very wide, it cannot get deep). –  Jbeuh Feb 10 '14 at 18:11
    
If you try generate 2000 1000, then you will know –  Jackson Tale Feb 10 '14 at 22:43
    
Well, there are approximately $10^{827}$ elements in the list I would be trying to generate, so I'm not sure there is a point :). But if you change the code so that it computes the number of solutions and not the actual solutions (using BigInt), then you can handle larger values of n and m. The code I wrote will fail then, not because it's not tail recursivee but because it's not memoized. –  Jbeuh Feb 11 '14 at 6:33
    
What does this mean?? <|>. do you guys mind putting a comment on how you would write it without using <|>, <|. I tried updating my ocaml version but it did not work out. –  kikilala Feb 11 '14 at 22:05
let flatten_tail l =
  let rec flat acc = function
    | [] -> List.rev acc
    | hd::tl -> flat (List.rev_append hd acc) tl
  in 
  flat [] l

let concat_map_tail f l =
  List.rev_map f l |> List.rev |> flatten_tail

let rm_dup l =
  if List.length l = 0 then l
  else 
    let sl = List.sort compare l in
    List.fold_left (
      fun (acc, e) x -> if x <> e then x::acc, x else acc,e
    ) ([List.hd sl], List.hd sl) (List.tl sl) |> fst |> List.rev

(* algorithm starts from here *)
let buckets m =
  let rec generate acc m =
    if m = 0 then acc
    else generate (0::acc) (m-1)
  in 
  generate [] m

let throw_1_ball bs =
  let rec throw acc before = function
    | [] -> acc
    | b::tl -> 
      let new_before = b::before in
      let new_acc = (List.rev_append before ((b+1)::tl))::acc in
      throw new_acc new_before tl
  in 
  throw [] [] bs

let throw_n_ball n m = 
  let bs = buckets m in
  let rec throw i acc =
    if i = 0 then acc
    else throw (i-1) (concat_map_tail throw_1_ball acc |> rm_dup)
  in 
  throw n [bs]

Above is the correct code, it is scary because I added several utility functions and make things as tail-recursive as possible. But the idea is very simple.

Here is the algorithm:

  1. Let's say we have 3 buckets, initially it is [0;0;0].
  2. If we throw 1 ball into the 3 buckets, we have 3 cases each of which is a snapshot of the buckets, i.e., [[1;0;0];[0;1;0];[0;0;1]].
  3. Then if we have 1 more ball, for each case above, we will 3 cases, so the resulting case list have 9 cases
  4. Then if we have 1 more ball, .....

In this way, we will generate 3^n cases and many of them may be redundant.

So when generated each case list, we just remove all duplicates in the case list.


 utop # throw_n_ball 3 2;;
- : int list list = [[0; 3]; [1; 2]; [2; 1]; [3; 0]]   

utop # throw_n_ball 5 3;;
- : int list list = [[0; 0; 5]; [0; 1; 4]; [0; 2; 3]; [0; 3; 2]; [0; 4; 1]; [0; 5; 0]; [1; 0; 4];[1; 1; 3]; [1; 2; 2]; [1; 3; 1]; [1; 4; 0]; [2; 0; 3]; [2; 1; 2]; [2; 2; 1]; [2; 3; 0]; [3; 0; 2]; [3; 1; 1]; [3; 2; 0]; [4; 0; 1]; [4; 1; 0]; [5; 0; 0]]  
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I just put in into the ocaml interpreter but it keeps complaining about line 6 has type int but an expression was expected of type 'a list list. Do you have any ideas why that is so? –  kikilala Feb 9 '14 at 0:58
    
@kikilala I don't have any problem compiling it. maybe the code was too long and wide. I reformatted it. Please make sure copy paste all codes –  Jackson Tale Feb 9 '14 at 1:33
    
@kikilala you are compiling it in .ml file or utop? –  Jackson Tale Feb 9 '14 at 1:36
    
compiling in .ml file. My program is not recognizing |>.. What does |> do? –  kikilala Feb 9 '14 at 6:04
    
@kikilala oh I think you should upgrade to the newest ocaml version 4.00.1. |> means put the left hand side part to right hand side part as parameter. So without it you have to write f x, with it you can write x |> f. New feature of 4.00.1. –  Jackson Tale Feb 9 '14 at 13:52

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