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This is a quite typical game.

You are given a list of integers, together with a value.

You use parenthesis, +, -, *, / to get to closest to the given value.

It is not necessary that all integers inside the list must be used. And you are chasing for the closest value, if an identical one cannot be computed out.


For example, You are give [1;3;7;10;25;50] and 831. The closest you can do is

7 + (1 + 10) * (25 + 50) = 832


How to write a program to solve this in FP or ocaml?

  1. How to apply the parenthesis?
  2. How to generate all possible expressions?
share|improve this question
    
Your example doesn't follow the rules :-) Parentheses are just a surface feature to control order of evaluation. I would consider solving using a denser notation (such as RPN) then convert to infix notation at the end. – Jeffrey Scofield Feb 8 '14 at 22:33
    
@JeffreyScofield corrected. – Jackson Tale Feb 8 '14 at 22:55
2  
It's a fun problem, but how is it specific to OCaml? – Martin Jambon Feb 9 '14 at 7:31
    
@MartinJambon No, it is not specific to OCaml. Can I ask then a particular solution in one language? – Jackson Tale Feb 9 '14 at 21:07
    
I mean the question is about an algorithm to solve this problem. Even brute force is not trivial, but going from an algorithm expressed in pseudo-code to a valid OCaml program would be faster to answer and would provide value to more people as well. – Martin Jambon Feb 9 '14 at 21:21
up vote 2 down vote accepted
let (|->) l f = List.concat (List.map f l)

type op = Add | Sub | Mul | Div

let apply op x y =
  match op with
  | Add -> x + y
  | Sub -> x - y
  | Mul -> x * y
  | Div -> x / y

let valid op x y =
  match op with
  | Add -> true
  | Sub -> x > y
  | Mul -> true
  | Div -> x mod y = 0

type expr = Val of int | App of op * expr * expr

let rec eval = function
  | Val n -> if n > 0 then Some n else None
  | App (o,l,r) ->
    eval l |> map_option (fun x ->
      eval r |> map_option (fun y ->
      if valid o x y then Some (apply o x y)
      else None))

let list_diff a b = List.filter (fun e -> not (List.mem e b)) a
let is_unique xs =
  let rec aux = function
    | [] -> true
    | x :: xs when List.mem x xs -> false
    | x :: xs -> aux xs in
  aux xs

let rec values = function
  | Val n -> [n]
  | App (_,l,r) -> values l @ values r

let solution e ns n =
  list_diff (values e) ns = [] && is_unique (values e) &&
  eval e = Some n

(* Brute force solution. *)

let split l =
  let rec aux lhs acc = function
    | [] | [_] -> []
    | [y; z] -> (List.rev (y::lhs), [z])::acc
    | hd::rhs ->
      let lhs = hd::lhs in
      aux lhs ((List.rev lhs, rhs)::acc) rhs in
  aux [] [] l

let combine l r =
  List.map (fun o->App (o,l,r)) [Add; Sub; Mul; Div]
let rec exprs = function
  | [] -> []
  | [n] -> [Val n]
  | ns ->
    split ns |-> (fun (ls,rs) ->
      exprs ls |-> (fun l ->
        exprs rs |-> (fun r ->
          combine l r)))

let rec choices = function _ -> failwith "choices: implement as homework"

let guard n =
  List.filter (fun e -> eval e = Some n)
let solutions ns n =
  choices ns |-> (fun ns' ->
    exprs ns' |> guard n)

(* Alternative implementation *)

let guard p e =
  if p e then [e] else []
let solutions ns n =
  choices ns |-> (fun ns' ->
    exprs ns' |->
      guard (fun e -> eval e = Some n))

For explanation, see Functional Programming in OCaml.

share|improve this answer
    
where in Functional Programming in OCaml I can find the explanation? – Jackson Tale Feb 9 '14 at 13:51
    
@JacksonTale lecture 6 slides 33-43, it also has the optimized version. – lukstafi Feb 9 '14 at 20:52

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