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I have the following SPARQL query:

PREFIX rdfs: <http://www.w3.org/2000/01/rdf-schema#> 
PREFIX type: <http://dbpedia.org/class/yago/>      
PREFIX prop: <http://dbpedia.org/property/>
SELECT *
WHERE {
  ?person a foaf:Person;
  foaf:name ?name;
  prop:deathCause ?death_cause.
  FILTER (langMatches(lang(?name), "EN")) .
}
LIMIT 50

If you run this here: http://dbpedia.org/snorql/

You will see that you get a lot of results. Now I would like to filter out one death cause, let's say 'Traffic collision'. So this should be simply by adding a filter:

FILTER (?death_cause = "Traffic collision").

So the query should then be:

PREFIX rdfs: <http://www.w3.org/2000/01/rdf-schema#> 
PREFIX type: <http://dbpedia.org/class/yago/>      
PREFIX prop: <http://dbpedia.org/property/>
SELECT *
WHERE {
  ?person a foaf:Person;
  foaf:name ?name;
  prop:deathCause ?death_cause.
  FILTER (?death_cause = "Traffic collision").
  FILTER (langMatches(lang(?name), "EN")) .
}
LIMIT 50

However this returns nothing. Anyone that knows what is wrong with the query? Thanks.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You will see that you get a lot of results. Now I would like to filter out one death cause, let's say 'Traffic collision'. So this should be simply by adding a filter:

FILTER (?death_cause = "Traffic collision" ).

Filters define what things you keep, not what things you remove, so if you wanted to filter out traffic collisions, you'd actually want:

FILTER ( ?death_cause != "Traffic collision" )

If you try that, though, you'll still see traffic collisions in your results, because there's a difference between "Traffic collision" and "Traffic collision"@en. The former (which is what your code would be removing) is a plain literal (i.e., without a datatype or a language tag). The latter is a literal with the language tag "en". These are not the same, so filtering out one doesn't filter out the other, and keeping one won't keep the other. To remove the "Traffic collision"@en, you can filter it out with:

FILTER ( ?death_cause != "Traffic collision"@en )

Alternatively, you can use the str function to get the lexical part of a literal, so you could filter out "Traffic collision" regardless of the language tag (or datatype, if it appeared as a typed literal):

FILTER ( str(?death_cause) != "Traffic collision" )

Thus:

PREFIX rdfs: <http://www.w3.org/2000/01/rdf-schema#> 
PREFIX type: <http://dbpedia.org/class/yago/>      
PREFIX prop: <http://dbpedia.org/property/>
SELECT *
WHERE {
  ?person a foaf:Person;
  foaf:name ?name;
  prop:deathCause ?death_cause.
  FILTER (langMatches(lang(?name), "EN")) .
  FILTER ( ?death_cause != "Traffic collision"@en )
}
LIMIT 50

SPARQL results

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks! Sorry, I actually didn't mean filter out, I wanted a single death cause. But removing the "!" in the last query in your answer solves that and learning to filter out I consider a bonus! A small follow-up: What is the reasoning behind adding str() around the property name/variable? That is not obvious. –  Marius Lian Feb 8 at 23:12
1  
@MariusLian Literals in RDF can be plain (no language or datatype), typed (with a datatype), or language tagged (with a language tag). str extracts the string part from all three kinds. I've added more explanation to the answer. –  Joshua Taylor Feb 9 at 1:27
    
So actually in the other filter that is what happens. The lang() function extracts the language part. Thanks for a clear explanation! –  Marius Lian Feb 11 at 0:05

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