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I did till this however it is not showing any output.

import acm.program.*;
import acm.graphics.*;

import java.awt.*;

public class Test5 extends GraphicsProgram {

    public void run() {
    GRect rect = new GRect(0,0,50,50);

for(int i=1;i<=8;i++){

    for(int j=1;j<=8;j++)
      {
        if(((i + j) % 2 == 0))
          {
             rect.setColor(Color.WHITE);}
         else
          {
            rect.setColor(Color.BLACK); }
            add(rect);
          }
          }
      } 
   }
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I think you forgot to create and add each rect, move your call to new into the second loop. –  Elliott Frisch Feb 9 at 3:56
    
You're not really showing much... What is GraphicsProgram? Is that a class you wrote? –  Rogue Feb 9 at 3:56
    
Yes it is a class and I already add the rect...bt still –  user3288807 Feb 9 at 3:58
    
@Rogue: GraphicsProgram is a class that is part of the ACM library, a library that is used by some schools to teach Java. It is based on older versions of Swing and tries to simplify graphics programming greatly. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Feb 9 at 4:06
    
@HovercraftFullOfEels ah, thanks! –  Rogue Feb 9 at 4:16
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1 Answer 1

A simple approach:

Check if both i and j are even or if both i and j are odd.

Better yet, you can just compare the evenness/oddness of i and j for equality.

// Fill black.
g.setColor(Color.BLACK);
g.fillRect(0, 0, getWidth(), getHeight());

// Color red tiles.
g.setColor(Color.RED);
for (int i = 0; i < 8; i++) {
    for (int j = 0; j < 8; j++) {
        if (i % 2 == j % 2) {
            g.fillRect(i * tileSize, j * tileSize, tileSize, tileSize);
        }
    }
}

enter image description here

import java.awt.Color;
import java.awt.Container;
import java.awt.Dimension;
import java.awt.Graphics;

import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JPanel;

public class ChessBoard extends JPanel {
    private int size;

    public ChessBoard(int size) {
        this.setPreferredSize(new Dimension(size, size));

        this.size = size;
    }

    @Override
    protected void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
        super.paintComponent(g);

        int tileSize = size / 8;

        // Fill black.
        g.setColor(Color.BLACK);
        g.fillRect(0, 0, getWidth(), getHeight());

        // Color red tiles.
        g.setColor(Color.RED);
        for (int i = 0; i < 8; i++) {
            for (int j = 0; j < 8; j++) {
                if (i % 2 == j % 2) {
                    g.fillRect(i * tileSize, j * tileSize, tileSize, tileSize);
                }
            }
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        JFrame f = new JFrame();
        Container c = new ChessBoard(400);

        f.setContentPane(c);
        f.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        f.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
        f.pack();
        f.setVisible(true);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
even simpler, Color c = (i % 2 == j % 2) ? DARK_COLOR : LIGHT_COLOR; –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Feb 9 at 4:07
    
Thanks for the tip. Well, I would not want to have to color every cell, just every other. So switching the color around is pointless if the background is already the color of the opposite tiles. –  Mr. Polywhirl Feb 9 at 4:08
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