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How can I get the current absolute URL in my Ruby on Rails view?

The request.request_uri only returns the relative URL.

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31 Answers 31

up vote 1073 down vote accepted

For Rails 3.2 or Rails 4+

You should use request.original_url to get the current URL.

This method is documented at http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActionDispatch/Request.html#method-i-original_url, but if you're curious, the implementation is:

def original_url
  base_url + original_fullpath
end

For Rails 3:

You can write "#{request.protocol}#{request.host_with_port}#{request.fullpath}", since request.url is now deprecated.


For Rails 2:

You can write request.url instead of request.request_uri. This combines the protocol (usually http://) with the host, and request_uri to give you the full address.

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28  
as other users pointed: DEPRECATION WARNING: Using #request_uri is deprecated. Use fullpath instead – giladbu Apr 26 '11 at 17:20
9  
@giladbu fullpath does NOT include the protocol/domain/port! It’s not an absolute URL! – Alan H. Aug 1 '11 at 21:36
29  
"http://#{request.host+request.fullpath}" will work or otherwise, (if the port is important) "http://#{request.host}:#{request.port+request.fullpath}" – Nilloc Feb 1 '12 at 20:21
7  
if port important, this one works right: "http://#{request.host}:#{request.port}#{request.fullpath}" – Sucrenoir Apr 19 '12 at 15:16
9  
request.url works for me on rails 3.0.3 – Magesh Apr 27 '12 at 13:55

I think that the Ruby on Rails 3.0 method is now request.fullpath.

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8  
fullpath doesn't include the domain – lulalala May 13 '13 at 2:31

You could use url_for(:only_path => false)

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4  
Just using url_for (with no params) also works. – David Morales Apr 13 '12 at 8:58

DEPRECATION WARNING: Using #request_uri is deprecated. Use fullpath instead.

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3  
See notes on answer stackoverflow.com/a/2165727/166279, fullpath doesn't include the domain. – Nilloc Feb 1 '12 at 20:07
1  
@ManishShrivastava: funny, in spite of all the "original" effort I put answering more complex questions, this copy and paste gave me the highest score, well... better than nothing – ecoologic Aug 27 '14 at 0:02

If you're using Rails 3.2 or Rails 4 you should use request.original_url to get the current URL.


Documentation for the method is at http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActionDispatch/Request.html#method-i-original_url but if you're curious the implementation is:

def original_url
  base_url + original_fullpath
end
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You can add this current_url method in the ApplicationController to return the current URL and allow merging in other parameters

current_url --> http://...
current_url(:page=>4) --> http://...&page=4
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1  
This does not appear to be defined in Rails 3.1. – Alan H. Aug 1 '11 at 21:39
1  
you could do it this way url_for params.merge(:format => "PDF", :only_path => false) – montrealmike Jul 17 '12 at 19:28
2  
also if you are in a link_to you can just use params.merge and skip the url_for altogether – montrealmike Jul 17 '12 at 19:44

In Ruby on Rails 3.1.0.rc4:

 request.fullpath
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3  
fullpath does not provide an absolute URL as the original poster requested. – Olivier Lacan Nov 7 '12 at 18:15

For Ruby on Rails 3:

request.url
request.host_with_port

I fired up a debugger session and queried the request object:

request.public_methods
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I needed the application URL but with the subdirectory. I used:

root_url(:only_path => false)
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 url_for(params)

And you can easily add some new parameter:

url_for(params.merge(:tag => "lol"))
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5  
This is far more elegant (if less granular) than the approved answer. – Olivier Lacan Nov 7 '12 at 18:12

I think request.domain would work, but what if you're in a sub directory like blah.blah.com? Something like this could work:

<%= request.env["HTTP_HOST"] + page = "/" + request.path_parameters['controller'] + "/" + request.path_parameters['action'] %>

Change the parameters based on your path structure.

Hope that helps!

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8  
Yes Jaime's answer is way better, but if you want to be really inefficient, you could do it my way. – James M Jan 29 '10 at 22:47

It looks like request_uri is deprecated in Ruby on Rails 3.

Using #request_uri is deprecated. Use fullpath instead.
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This works for Ruby on Rails 3.0 and should be supported by most versions of Ruby on Rails:

request.env['REQUEST_URI']
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Using Ruby 1.9.3-p194 and Ruby on Rails 3.2.6:

If request.fullpath doesn't work for you, try request.env["HTTP_REFERER"]

Here's my story below.

I got similar problem with detecting current URL (which is shown in address bar for user in her browser) for cumulative pages which combines information from different controllers, for example, http://localhost:3002/users/1/history/issues.

The user can switch to different lists of types of issues. All those lists are loaded via Ajax from different controllers/partials (without reloading).

The problem was to set the correct path for the back button in each item of the list so the back button could work correctly both in its own page and in the cumulative page history.

In case I use request.fullpath, it returns the path of last JavaScript request which is definitely not the URL I'm looking for.

So I used request.env["HTTP_REFERER"] which stores the URL of the last reloaded request.

Here's an excerpt from the partial to make a decision

- if request.env["HTTP_REFERER"].to_s.scan("history").length > 0
  - back_url = user_history_issue_path(@user, list: "needed_type")
- else
  - back_url = user_needed_type_issue_path(@user)
- remote ||= false
=link_to t("static.back"), back_url, :remote => remote
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2  
Works great, just what I needed. This should be in a seperate question and answer though. Kinda hard to find here. :/ – DDDD Apr 7 '14 at 16:31

None of the suggestions here in the thread helped me sadly, except the one where someone said he used the debugger to find what he looked for.

I've created some custom error pages instead of the standard 404 and 500, but request.url ended in /404 instead of the expected /non-existing-mumbo-jumbo.

What I needed to use was

request.original_url
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If by relative, you mean just without the domain, then look into request.domain.

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you can use ruby method:

:root_url

you will get the full path: localhost:3000/bla

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(url_for(:only_path => false) == "/" )? root_url : url_for(:only_path => false)
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In Rails 3 you can use

request.original_url

http://apidock.com/rails/v3.2.8/ActionDispatch/Request/original_url

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You can use:

request.full_path

or

request.url

Hopefully it will resolve your problem.

Cheers

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Rails 4.0

you can use request.original_url, output will be as given below example

get "/articles?page=2"

request.original_url # => "http://www.example.com/articles?page=2"
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if you want to be specific, meaning, you know the path you need:

link_to current_path(@resource, :only_path => false), current_path(@resource)
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For rails 3 :

request.fullpath

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request.env["REQUEST_URI"]

works in rails 2.3.4 tested and do not know about other versions.

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1  
works also in Rails 3.2.14 – shilovk Dec 26 '14 at 14:15

you can use any one for rails 3.2:

request.original_url
or
request.env["HTTP_REFERER"]
or
request.env['REQUEST_URI']

I think it will work every where

"#{request.protocol}#{request.host}:#{request.port}#{request.fullpath}"
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To get the request URL without any query parameters.

def current_url_without_parameters
  request.base_url + request.path
end
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You can either use

request.original_url 

or

"#{request.protocol}#{request.host_with_port}" 

to get the current URL.

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To get the absolute URL which means that the from the root it can be displayed like this

<%= link_to 'Edit', edit_user_url(user) %>

The users_url helper generates a URL that includes the protocol and host name. The users_path helper generates only the path portion.

users_url: http://localhost/users
users_path: /users
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Rails 4

Controller:

def absolute_url
  request.base_url + request.original_fullpath
end

Action Mailer Notable changes in 4.2 release:

link_to and url_for generate absolute URLs by default in templates, it is no longer needed to pass only_path: false. (Commit)

View:

If you use the _url suffix, the generated URL is absolute. Use _path to get a relative URL.

<%= link_to "Home", root_url %>

For More Details, go to:

http://blog.grepruby.com/2015/04/absolute-url-full-url-in-rails-4.html

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1  
A custom method is not needed. The correct answer is above. – ctc Apr 21 '15 at 19:46

You can set a variable to URI.parse(current_url), I don't see this proposal here yet and it works for me.

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