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After running the code below I get this output: Eve 1200

Could anyone explain me why the value of Person type variable is being changed and value of Integer type variable is not? I have already read this:

  1. www.javaworld.com/javaworld/javaqa/2000-05/03-qa-0526-pass.html
  2. www.yoda.arachsys.com/java/passing.html#formal

but I don't get why with Person and Integer types it works different.

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Object person = new Person("Adam");
        Object integer = new Integer("1200");

        changePerson(person);
        changeInteger(integer);

        System.out.println(person);
        System.out.println(integer);
    }

    private static void changeInteger(Object integer) {
        integer = 1000;
    }

    private static void changePerson(Object person) {
        ((Person)person).name="Eve"; 
    }
}
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To post code on Stack Overflow, indent each line by 4 spaces. You can select the code in your question and click the toolbar button, or hit Ctrl+K, to do this. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Jan 29 '10 at 23:30
    
many thanks for this hint ;) –  Marcin Sanecki Jan 29 '10 at 23:33

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In Java, primitive types (such as integer) are always handled exclusively by value, and objects (such as your Person) and arrays are always handled exclusively by reference.

If you pass a primitive the value will be copied, if you pass a reference type the address will be copied, hence the differences.

If you follow those links above and/or do a bit of googlin' you'll find out more.

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In the link given by you it is really good described what is going on. Many thanks! –  Marcin Sanecki Jan 30 '10 at 1:26
    
glad if it helped –  JohnIdol Jan 30 '10 at 3:04

In the Integer case, you're changing the value of the parameter itself (which is local to the method). In the Person case, you're changing the value of a field inside the parameter. That field is part of the object, and so it's visible to the caller.

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I think you are wrong... –  Marcin Sanecki Jan 29 '10 at 23:38
    
Take a List type variable, put it as a method parameter and you will be able to change it. I think mihirsm is on the right way with this statement: Aslo, do keep in mind that Integer (and so are other primitive wrappers) mutable. Any time you need to assign a new value to the ref var, JDK will create a whole new object. –  Marcin Sanecki Jan 29 '10 at 23:51

In changeInteger() when you do integer = 1000 a new object is created and assigned a local variable integer. So if you do

person = new Person();
person.name="Eve";

in changePerson()

you will get the same behavior as for integer.

PS: The old references are lost once you assign it to newly created objects inside the function.

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OK. The field name from Person class is not final. In integer class value of class instance is stored in field int which is set as final. If I set the field name as final I am not able to change its value in changePerson() method. But I still fill that I don't know all the mechanism... –  Marcin Sanecki Jan 30 '10 at 0:09
    
I did a test with StringBuilder type. This type store string in an array which is not declared as final! There was no problem to pass an instance of StringBuilder to a method and append something to the StringBuilder variable. I think that for all primitives and their wrappers JDK do extra job I was not aware. I need to some exact explanation... –  Marcin Sanecki Jan 30 '10 at 0:19
    
As I said when you do integer = 1000 you create a new object which is similar to integer = new Integer("1000") –  Vishal Jan 30 '10 at 0:22
    
Am I right that this happens because Integer is a wrapper for int and store the value in final field? –  Marcin Sanecki Jan 30 '10 at 0:29

In changePerson() you change the given object itself via his public name property. In changeInteger() you change the local Integer Object;

Put a System.out.println(integer); inside the changeInteger() function and you will see, that the Integer changes, but only in function scope..

private static void changeInteger(Object integer) {
    integer = 1000;
    System.out.println(integer);
}
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I know that. the question is why it works in this way. –  Marcin Sanecki Jan 30 '10 at 0:13

In the changeInteger() method you are assigning a completely new object (1000) to the reference variable integer. But the reference variable integer in the main() method still points to the old object (1200). Thus the print() statement in the main() method prints the old value (1200)

However, in the changePerson() method the reference variable person still points to the old object. Just that a value of one of its field is being change.

Aslo, do keep in mind that Integer (and so are other primitive wrappers) mutable. Any time you need to assign a new value to the ref var, JDK will create a whole new object.

Hope this helps!

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Why in changeInteger() case new object assigned and in changePerson() case not? –  Marcin Sanecki Jan 29 '10 at 23:44
    
behind the scenes i = 1000 will be same as i = new Integer(1000) on the other hand, if, lets say, there was a method i.value = 1000 then the main() would have printed 1000 –  Mihir Mathuria Jan 30 '10 at 0:14

Your code below compiles? It needs a cast.

private static void changeInteger(Object integer) {
    integer = 1000;
}

Your integer will be changed if it was embedded in another object e.g. Person.

EDIT :

Wrong on the compilation issue. In Java, references are copied by value. So in first case the reference get pointed to different memory. In the second case, name comes as part of Person. Since you are changing name through Person without changing Person, change in name is reflected outside method. Hope this helps.

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It compiles under with jdk 1.6 no casting is needed. What I already get is that value on Integer type is stored in final field. When field name from Person class is changed to final then the code does not compile... –  Marcin Sanecki Jan 29 '10 at 23:32

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