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I was having trouble implementing namedtuple._replace(), so I copied the code right off of the documentation:

Point = namedtuple('Point', 'x,y')

p = Point(x=11, y=22)

p._replace(x=33)

print p

and I got:

Point(x=11, y=22)

instead of:

Point(x=33, y=22)

as is shown in the doc.

I'm using Python 2.6 on Windows 7

What's going on?

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1  
This works the same way as str.replace() does. Both strings and named tuples are immutable, so their replacement methods produce new values while leaving the old value unchanged. The solution to your problem is to save the new result to a variable. –  Raymond Hettinger Jul 4 at 1:50

4 Answers 4

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Yes it does, it works exactly as documented.

._replace returns a new namedtuple, it does not modify the original, so you need to write this:

p = p._replace(x=33)

See here: somenamedtuple._replace(kwargs) for more information.

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A tuple is immutable. _replace() returns a new tuple with your modifications:

p = p._replace(x=33)
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namedtuple._replace() returns a new tuple; the original is unchanged.

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1  
Thank you all. I wish I could accept all the responses. –  Peter Stewart Jan 30 '10 at 0:12

It looks to me as if namedtuple is immutable, like its forebear, tuple.

>>> from collections import namedtuple
>>> Point = namedtuple('Point', 'x,y')
>>>
>>> p = Point(x=11, y=22)
>>>
>>> p._replace(x=33)
Point(x=33, y=22)
>>> print(p)
Point(x=11, y=22)
>>> p = p._replace(x=33)
>>> print(p)
Point(x=33, y=22)

NamedTuple._replace returns a new NamedTuple of the same type but with values changed.

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1  
FWIW, the method name was inspired by str.replace() which has a remarkably similar pattern of use :-) s='the quick brown fox'; s=s.replace('quick', 'slow') –  Raymond Hettinger Nov 30 '11 at 7:37
2  
THE Raymond Hettinger? Honored. –  hughdbrown Nov 30 '11 at 15:22

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