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Let say I have some constants that I want to name:

foo = 1234
bar = 5678
baz = 1337

By default, the type is Num a => a but wouldn't it be considered good practice to declare types for these constants explicitly?

Doing it like this would be quite verbose:

foo :: Int
foo = 1234

bar :: Int
bar = 5678

baz :: Int
baz = 1337

You could do it like this:

foo, bar, baz :: Int
foo = 1234
bar = 5678
baz = 1337

Which works fine when there aren't too many but when the number of constants increases, you might have to line wrap them and also, it feels like you're repeating yourself.

How about this?:

foo = 1234 :: Int
bar = 5678 :: Int
baz = 1337 :: Int

Would that be considered good style? What's the convention?

Update

Actually, it seems like GHC doesn't consider the last example having any type declarations at all since it warns about "Top-level binding with no type signature".

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Actually, due to the monomorphism restriction, the default type wouldn't be Num a => a. But one might want a different type than GHC chooses by default, so it's still an important question. –  delnan Feb 9 at 17:51
1  
I would prefer this version foo, bar, baz :: Int, but it is a matter of taste. –  adamse Feb 9 at 17:53
1  
Actually, it seems like GHC doesn't consider the last example having any type declarations at all since it warns about "Top-level binding with no type signature". –  Emil Eriksson Feb 9 at 17:54
1  
You can do any you please, and I prefer the last one. (You can do foo, bar, baz :: Int (foo,bar,baz) = (1234,5678,1337) as well if you like terseness, but your last one is still clearest.) –  enough rep to comment Feb 9 at 17:58
    
The foo, bar, baz :: Int then definitions style is the slickest, but it is not so good for source navigation with Haddock. For this reason I prefer to write single type signatures with their definitions directly below. –  stephen tetley Feb 9 at 18:44

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It depends on why you want all these constants, of course. Personally I would be inclined to give explicit type signatures, yes. If you have a lot of these to declare, I would probably go for

foo = 1234 :: Int
bar = 5678 :: Int
baz = 1337 :: Int

GHC may warn about missing top-level type declarations, but the above bindings are perfectly monomorphic, so you're paying no run-time polymorphism penalty, and the code is clearly readable. (And you can easily add more entries later.)

I might inquire as to why you need to define so many integer constants, and humbly suggest that there may be some more idiomatic way to achieve what you're trying to do - but that would be the subject of another question. For the matter in hand, basically any of the options you've suggested is "fine", but my own personal preference (and that is all it is) would be for the example above.

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I am well aware that it is not idiomatic to do so. In this case, it was a binding to a C library. I will wrap this in something else. –  Emil Eriksson Feb 10 at 9:41
    
@EmilEriksson I suspected that might be the case... although in that instance, wouldn't these constants be auto-generated by some tool? (In which case, it wouldn't matter how much typing it is.) –  MathematicalOrchid Feb 10 at 10:07
    
Yes, I should probably be using hsc2hs or c2hs but I wanted to try it by hand first. –  Emil Eriksson Feb 11 at 11:37

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