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I can get the value of the protected field, but the private field throws java.lang.IllegalAccessException. I think I know why I'm getting this exception, but how is reflection used to exploit the contents of private fields, how do I get around this?

Programmer Hat is on
I have created the following Vulnerable class in a netbeans project. I have made a Jar file to distribute it.

public class Vulnerable {
    private int privateSecret;
    protected int protectedSecret;
    int secret;

    public Vulnerable() {
    this.protectedSecret = 11;
    this.privateSecret = 22;
    this.secret = 33;
    }
}

Malicious Hacker Hat is now on
I want to know private hidden fields and I want to know what they contain.
I have the Jar file and I have imported it into my Exploit project.

The following class extends Vulnerable and uses reflection to list fields and try to access the values.

public class ExpliotSubClass extends VulnerableCode.Vulnerable {

    public List<Field> protectedList = new LinkedList<Field>();
    public List<Field> privateList = new LinkedList<Field>();

    public void lists() {
        Field[] declaredFields = this.getClass().getSuperclass().getDeclaredFields();

        for (Field field : declaredFields) {
            int modifiers = field.getModifiers();
            if (Modifier.isPrivate(modifiers)) {
                privateList.add(field);
                System.out.println("Private = " + field.getName());
            } else if (Modifier.isProtected(modifiers)) {
                protectedList.add(field);
                System.out.println("Protected= " + field.getName());
            }
        }
    }


    public Object get(Field field) {
        try {
            return field.get(this);
        } catch (IllegalArgumentException ex) {
            Logger.getLogger(ExpliotSubClass.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE,
                                                                  null,
                                                                  ex);
        } catch (IllegalAccessException ex) {
            Logger.getLogger(ExpliotSubClass.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE,
                                                                  null,
                                                                  ex);
        }
        return null;
    }
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In order to access private field you have to set it as accessible:

field.setAccessible(true);
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HA! that is easy, I spent allot longer formulating and constructing that question, than what was needed to answer it. :( lol –  Another Compiler Error Feb 9 '14 at 20:23
    
@AnotherCompilerError It's easy when you know where's the problem :) –  Kuba Spatny Feb 9 '14 at 20:25
    
If I had further questions about this topic is best to ask here or open another question? –  Another Compiler Error Feb 9 '14 at 20:28
    
@AnotherCompilerError If the question is, "how do I prevent this?" then that is definitely deserving of a second question. –  Saposhiente Feb 9 '14 at 20:29
    
if it's not connected to accessing private fields, I would recommend a new question (so others having that same problem can find it later) –  Kuba Spatny Feb 9 '14 at 20:29

in this lists() method, you should add the following code, before adding the field object to the privateList.

-field.setAccessible(true);

That is the code for the lists method will become

public void lists() { Field[] declaredFields = this.getClass().getSuperclass().getDeclaredFields();

    for (Field field : declaredFields) {
        int modifiers = field.getModifiers();
        if (Modifier.isPrivate(modifiers)) {
            field.setAccessible(true);//Add this
            privateList.add(field);
            System.out.println("Private = " + field.getName());
        } else if (Modifier.isProtected(modifiers)) {
            protectedList.add(field);
            System.out.println("Protected= " + field.getName());
        }
    }
}

Now run your code. It will work.

share|improve this answer
    
is the class field accessible or only just the when referenced by that particular field object in memory, which has now been placed in the list. –  Another Compiler Error Feb 9 '14 at 20:40

If you have the .jar can you just decompile it and then parse the .java file to get the info you need?

share|improve this answer
    
-1? I thought it was a valid work around, even if it wasn't in the spirit of the question. –  Carlos Bribiescas Feb 9 '14 at 20:16
    
Not what the asker wants to accomplish; the secret might not be available at compile time. Also, .jars contain .class files, not .java files, which must then be decompiled to get something approximating, but not identical to, the original .java –  Saposhiente Feb 9 '14 at 20:17
    
Yeah, i said to decompile it. My understanding is the .java files obtained would have a list of the hardcoded values as well as all the members of the class –  Carlos Bribiescas Feb 9 '14 at 20:18
    
You can get the default value, but the simplest and correct answer is Kuba's –  Bohemian Feb 9 '14 at 20:19
1  
It only works if the value is hardcoded; most secret values are not. –  Saposhiente Feb 9 '14 at 20:19

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