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I'm pretty stumped with this so if anyone has any ideas. I have the generic method

public void Foo<TClass>(TClass item) where TClass : class
{ }

And I want to call this method from another generic method, but this generic method doesn't have the type constraint "where TClass : class"

public void Bar<T>(T item)
{
    this.Foo<T>(item);
} 

This doesn't work, I get the error

"The type 'T' must be a reference type in order to use it as parameter 'TClass'"

Which I understand. But my question is this - is there anything I can do with C# syntax in order to "filter" the generic type "T" to pass it to "this.Bar" if it is a class. Something like....

public void Bar<T>(T item)
{
    if (typeof(T).IsClass)
        this.Foo<T **as class**>();
} 

I realise I could use reflection to call Foo, but this just seems like cheating. Is there something I can do with C# to pass "T" on with the constraint at runtime?

Also - I can't change the constraint on the method "Bar" as it comes from an interface so the constraint has to match the constraint on the interface

share|improve this question
    
Did you mean "this.Foo<T **as class**>();" ? –  Euphoric Feb 9 '14 at 21:25
    
well spotted - edited :) –  jcharlzworth Feb 9 '14 at 21:26
1  
So why don't you use if (typeof (T).IsClass) ?? –  Selman22 Feb 9 '14 at 21:27
1  
because the compiler won't read that logic, so I will still get a compile error when doing this.Foo<T>(item) –  jcharlzworth Feb 9 '14 at 21:28
    
@horrorcat ah,sorry now I understand you,it seems you need reflection, in your words cheating :) –  Selman22 Feb 9 '14 at 21:40

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The only way to call Foo without reflection, is to cast item to one of the types/classes in its hierarchy (after the proper IsClass check).

Obviously, there's only one type in its hierarchy that you know of a priori: Object.

public void Bar<T>(T item)
{
    if (typeof(T).IsClass)
        this.Foo((object) item);
} 

Edit :

Also, in one of the comments you said you added the class constraint to be to instantiate T. You don't need that, what you need is the new constraint.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow that actually compiles, I totally forgot you could "shortcut" generics like that cheers! Also yeah you're right, I did actually the new constraint as well but left it out of this question to simplify it :) –  jcharlzworth Feb 10 '14 at 23:49

Unfortunately there is no way to do this without changing Bar to have the generic constraint class or using reflection. In order to compile C# must know at compile time that T is indeed a class value. There is no way to use a dynamic test such as typeof(T).IsClass in order to satisfy this compile time constraint.

You mentioned in the question that you can't change Bar but it seems like you are willing to accept the possibility of dynamic failure. Perhaps instead change Foo to not have the constraint but instead throw an exception when T is not a class type

share|improve this answer
    
Hi thanks for you answer. I put the constraint on "Foo" because I wanted to use "Foo" to instantiate a new instance of the item. So "Foo" on it's own really needs to take an object that can be instantiated by doing "new T()". I'd rather have a runtime exception in "Bar" than "Foo". But if reflection is the only option then I guess thats fine :) –  jcharlzworth Feb 9 '14 at 21:35
if (typeof(T).IsClass)
{
    this.GetType()
        .GetMethod("Foo", System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Instance |
                          System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Public)
        .Invoke(this, new object[] { item });
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm pretty sure he explicitly asks if there is alternative to reflection. –  Euphoric Feb 9 '14 at 21:41

I believe there is no way to make it compile. You will have to use reflection to make the call.

Actually. You could cheat if you contain it within a class:

    public class Container<T>
    {
        public Container(T value)
        {
            Value = value;
        }

        public T Value { get; private set; }
    }

    public void Bar<T>(T item)
    {
        this.Foo<Container<T>>(new Container<T>(item));
    } 

but this adds one layer you need to call-through and makes the types less clear.

share|improve this answer
    
This won't work because Container<T> doesn't match Foo<T>(T item) and if you will change it to: Foo<T>(Container<T> item) than it will still say that T must be a ref type. –  Some1Pr0 Feb 9 '14 at 21:38
    
@Some1Pr0 What? –  Euphoric Feb 9 '14 at 21:41
    
he is saying that the line new Container<T>(item) won't compile because of the type constraint –  jcharlzworth Feb 9 '14 at 22:00

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