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import java.text.SimpleDateFormat;
import java.util.Date;
import org.joda.time.*;

public class Test {

  public static void main(String[] args) {

String dateStart = "01/01/2000 05:30";
String dateStop = "02/2/2001 06:31";

SimpleDateFormat format = new SimpleDateFormat("MM/dd/yyyy HH:mm");

Date d1 = null;
Date d2 = null;

try {
    d1 = format.parse(dateStart);
    d2 = format.parse(dateStop);

    DateTime dt1 = new DateTime(d1);
    DateTime dt2 = new DateTime(d2);

    System.out.print(Years.yearsBetween(dt1, dt2).getYears() + " years, ");
    System.out.print(Months.monthsBetween(dt1, dt2).getMonths() % 52 + " months, ");
    System.out.print(Weeks.weeksBetween(dt1, dt2).getWeeks() % 4 + " weeks, ");
    System.out.print(Days.daysBetween(dt1, dt2).getDays() % 7 + " days, ");
    System.out.print(Hours.hoursBetween(dt1, dt2).getHours() % 24 + " hours, ");
    System.out.print(Minutes.minutesBetween(dt1, dt2).getMinutes() % 60 + " minutes, ");


 } catch (Exception e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
 }

}

}

I want to output the number of years, months, weeks, days, hours, and minutes between two dates using Joda-Time. My question is where do I implement the number of weeks in a month (which in never constant). I don't think my %'s are right either.

When run I get:

1 years, 13 months, 0 weeks, 6 days, 1 hours, 1 minutes, 
share|improve this question
    
If you just use a Period, will that give you what you're after? –  Rob Hruska Feb 10 at 2:11
    
What do you mean by a Period? I know there are durations, intervals and periods but I do not know the difference. –  user3250237 Feb 10 at 2:12
    
    
What do you mean "number of days"? You need to define how you want to treat the 23-hour and 25-hour days that result when daylight savings begins and ends. –  David Wallace Feb 10 at 2:15
    
Once minutes exceeds 60 then 1 is added to hours. once hours exceeds 24 then 1 is added to days. once days exceeds 24 then one is added to weeks. etc. –  user3250237 Feb 10 at 2:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Period gives you this out of the box.

Period period = new Period(d1, d2);
System.out.print(period.getYears() + " years, ");
System.out.print(period.getMonths() + " months, ");
// ...

To prettify and get a little more control over the output, you can use a PeriodFormatterBuilder.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, you have been very helpful. –  user3250237 Feb 10 at 2:22

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