Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm currently working on a problem from hackerrank, and I'm going over the time limit for my problem. I can't seem to figure out why.

Output the pairs of numbers with the smallest difference. If there are multiple pairs, output all of them in ascending order, all on the same line (consecutively) with just a single space between each pair of numbers. If there’s a number which lies in two pair, print it two times (see sample case #3 for explanation).

Number of Input A string containing all the elements separated by whitespace

Sample:

4
5 4 3 2

Output:

2 3 3 4 4 5

The test case I'm failing on has 100,000 inputs. I timed my code, and the slowest part of my code is the loop in the function closest. I originally had a vector, and then used std:sort after I had the list. Then I tried using a multiset instead of calling std::sort to try and improve my performance. It still failed the test. Any ideas on how to improve the loop in closest, or the method addPair?

#include <iostream>
#include <set>
#include <utility>
#include <cmath>
#include <string>
#include <algorithm>
#include <ctime>

#define NUMBER 10000
double diffclock(clock_t clock1, clock_t clock2)
{
    double diffticks = clock1 - clock2;
    double diffms = (diffticks) / (CLOCKS_PER_SEC / NUMBER);
    return diffms;
}

class ClosestPair
{
    private:
        long _distance;
        const char UNSET = -1;
        std::multiset<int> _list;
        long getDistance(const int number1, const int number2) const;

    public:
        ClosestPair();
        ~ClosestPair();
        void addPair(const int number1, const int number2);
        const std::multiset<int>& getList() const;
        const std::string toString() const;
        void sort();

};

ClosestPair::ClosestPair()
{
    _distance = UNSET;
}

ClosestPair::~ClosestPair()
{
}

void ClosestPair::addPair(const int number1, const int number2)
{
    long distance = getDistance(number1, number2);

    if(distance < _distance || _distance == UNSET)
    {
        _list.clear();
        _distance = distance;
        //std::pair<int, int> newPair(number1, number2);
        //_list.push_back(newPair);
        _list.insert(number1);
        _list.insert(number2);
    }
    else if(distance == _distance)
    {
        _list.insert(number1);
        _list.insert(number2);
        //std::pair<int, int> newPair(number1, number2);
        //_list.push_back(newPair);
    }
}

inline long ClosestPair::getDistance(const int number1, const int number2) const
{
    return std::abs(number1 - number2);
}

const std::multiset<int>& ClosestPair::getList() const
{
    return _list;
}

const std::string ClosestPair::toString() const
{
    std::string allPairs;

    for(auto iterator = _list.begin(); iterator != _list.end(); iterator++)
    {
        allPairs += std::to_string(*iterator);
        allPairs += " ";
        //allPairs += std::to_string(iterator->second);
        //allPairs += " ";
    }

    if(allPairs.size() > 0)
    {
        allPairs.substr(0, allPairs.size() - 1);
    }

    return allPairs;
}

void ClosestPair::sort()
{
    //std::sort(_list.begin(), _list.end());
}

void closest(int* array, int size)
{
    ClosestPair closestPairs;

    clock_t begin = clock();
    for(int i = 0; i < size; i++)
    {
        for(int j = i + 1; j < size; j++)
        {
            closestPairs.addPair(array[i], array[j]);
        }
    }
    clock_t end = clock();
    std::cout << "AddPair time: " << diffclock(end, begin) << " ms." << std::endl;

    //closestPairs.sort();
    begin = clock();
    std::cout << closestPairs.toString();
    std::cout << "toString time: " << diffclock(end, begin) << " ms." << std::endl;
    end = clock();
}

int main()
{
    int sizeOfList;
    std::string allNumbers;
    std::cin >> sizeOfList >> std::ws;
    std::getline(std::cin, allNumbers);

    size_t position = 0;
    size_t nextPosition = 0;
    int count = 0;
    int array[sizeOfList];

    clock_t begin = clock();
    do
    {
        position = nextPosition;
        nextPosition = allNumbers.find(' ', position + 1);
        if(position > 0)
            position++;
        array[count] = atoi(allNumbers.substr(position, nextPosition - position).c_str());
        count++;
    }
    while(nextPosition != std::string::npos);
    clock_t end = clock();
    std::cout << "Tokenize time: " << diffclock(end, begin) << " ms." << std::endl;

    closest(array, sizeOfList);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
2  
'Any ideas on how to improve the loop in closet, or the method addPair?' Use a decent profiler and check where your bottlenecks are? – πάντα ῥεῖ Feb 10 '14 at 3:23
1  
It is hard to tell from the way you have written your code, but it appears you are basically doing a bubble sort. With 100,000 items, that would be 100,000 * 100,000 iterations, which would more than likely take well over the 60 second limit on most of those coding problem sites. – Zac Howland Feb 10 '14 at 3:25
1  
explain problem better. I have no idea what the problem you are trying to solve is from your description. – Yakk Feb 10 '14 at 3:25
    
@Zac Howland - That's what I figured, any idea on how to get all pairs besides having an N^2 formula? – user1932934 Feb 10 '14 at 3:27
    
Updated the problem so it's a little bit more clear. The bottleneck in my code is the loop. It calls addPair ~N^2 times. I'm not sure how to get the pairs any other way. – user1932934 Feb 10 '14 at 3:32
up vote 4 down vote accepted
// requires [b,e) is sorted:
template<typename Iterator>
std::vector<Iterator> find_close_pairs( Iterator b, Iterator e ){
  if (b==e || std::next(b) == e) return {};
  std::vector<std::size_t> retval = {0};
  auto old = *std::next(b) - *b;
  for(auto it = std::next(b); std::next(it) != e; ++it) {
    auto delta = *std::next(it) - *it;
    if (delta < old) {
      retval.clear();
      old = delta;
    }
    if (delta <= old) {
      retval.push_back(it);
    }
  }
  return retval;
}
// requires: iterators are writable.  Sorts range.  Faster with random access:
template<typename Iterator>
std::vector<std::pair<int,int>> solve(Iterator b, Iterator e) {
  std::sort(b, e);
  auto close_pairs_indexes = find_close_pairs(b, e);
  std::vector<std::pair<int,int>> retval;
  retval.reserve(close_pairs_indexes.size());
  for(auto it:close_pairs_indexes) {
    retval.push_back( {*it, *std::next(it)} );
  }
  return retval;
}
// requires: numbers is a container, not a C array:
template<typename Container>
std::vector<std::pair<int,int>> solve(sContainer numbers) {
  using std::begin; using std::end;
  return solve( begin(numbers), end(numbers) );
}

is C++11 and may have typos, but should do it. Code is overly terse as am on phone.

share|improve this answer
    
Are you sure this is getting all the pairs? Your for loop in find_close_pairs just seems to be taking the distance of the pairs that are next to each other, and not all combination of pairs. Nevermind it's sorted so this should work. Thank you. – user1932934 Feb 10 '14 at 4:26

If I understand your question correctly, you can also use a multimap. The map's key/value are int/pair(int,int).

Go through your sorted list 2 numbers at a time. Compute the difference between the two numbers. That difference becomes a key value in the map, and the pair are the two numbers you used to come up with the difference.

After you're done, you are guaranteed that the smallest differences are at the beginning of the map, since map uses < to sort the keys. You now have the smallest differences plus information on the pair of numbers that resulted in that difference.

For example:

#include <map>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>

typedef std::multimap<int, std::pair<int, int>> IntMap;
typedef std::vector<int> IntVect;

void getDifferences(const IntVect& intVect, IntMap& theMap)  // assume intVect is     sorted
{
    theMap.clear();
    if (intVect.size() < 2)
        return;

    size_t nItems = intVect.size();
    for (size_t i = 0; i < nItems - 1; ++i)
    {
       int num1 = intVect[i+1];
       int num2 = intVect[i];
       int diff = num1 - num2
       theMap.insert(std::make_pair(diff, std::make_pair(num2, num1)));
    }
}

int main()
{
    int Test[] = { 3, 4, 2, 7, 1, 11 };
    IntVect testV(Test, Test + sizeof(Test) / sizeof(Test[0]));
    std::sort(testV.begin(), testV.end());
    IntMap myMap;
    getDifferences(testV, myMap);
}

Note that the check for smallest never has to be done while building the map. Kind of makes this "safe", but the other non-map answer(s) more than likely perform faster.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, downvoted accidentally... – Martin J. Feb 10 '14 at 7:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.