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I have a little java app to effectively "tail" an arbitrary collection of files defined in an ini file. My "LogReader" class extends JFrame, and does the heavy lifting; reading the collection of file paths into a vector, and then iterating over the vector, reading each file and adding the last X lines of each to a text areas on the tabs of a JTabbedPane. The process of building the vector and iterating over the files is kicked off by clicking a JButton, via an ActionListener.

The reading of the files worked fine (and still does), but the process of reading 20-some files, some growing as large as 30MB, takes some time. To help pass that time, I decided to add a progress screen, which says "Now reading file #3 of 26: c:\logs\superduper1.log", and so on. So I created another class, "SplashScreen", also extending JFrame, and added a JLabel that would indicate the progress. The SplashScreen class has an update() method, which just does a setText() on the JLabel.

The ActionListener on the JButton calls RefreshLogs(), which looks something like:

vctFileStrings.clear();
tpMain.removeAll();
frmSplash.update("Loading Configuration"); //Update the label on the Splash Screen instance
BuildVectorOfLogs(strConfFile); //Read the collection of files into the vector
frmSplash.update("Reading Logs");
ReadLogs(); //read the files, updating the Splash Screen as we go

and then ReadLogs() iterates over the vector, reading the files and building the TabbedPane.

What I noticed, though, is that when RefreshLogs() is called from within the ActionListener, the Splash Screen doesn't update. However, if I add RefreshLogs() to the constructor of the first frame, the splash screen works as expected (updates progress on each file). After some experimenting and reading, I think that I need to create a worker thread that reads the files, while updating the splash screen in the event-dispatch queue.

My questions are:
- Is my thought correct? Is there some simple alternative to implementing threading that would allow me to update the splash screen from the method called by the ActionListener?
- If this would be best accomplished using threading, what scope of the activity would I need to thread? Would I need to put all of the file I/O activities into their own thread? Should I put the GUI activities (label updates) in their own thread, so they occur separately from the JButton click event?

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3 Answers 3

I would say: yes, your thoughts on offloading the reading of large files to a separate thread are correct. You should never perform long tasks on the Event Dispatch Thread, since while that thread is busy, the GUI will be unresponsive, and you application will feel slow.

This sounds like good case for SwingWorker. This class allows you to perform slow requests (such as disk or network access) on a separate thread, with progress updates being fed back to the GUI with the EDT. SwingWorker looks after all complexities of switching between threads. All you have to do is implement your business logic in the appropriate places.

Sun has a tutorial on SwingWorker.

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Yes, you should put your time intense reading into a separate thread. Now you do everything in the event-dispatching thread (EDT), which would update your GUI but is busy reading your data.

You can use SwingWorker for this. Have a look at Using a Swing Worker Thread which looks like what you need.

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One suggestion for you, to figure out how to do this, and in case you are using NetBeans or have access to NetBeans, is to look at the default Java Desktop Application template. It creates a pre-wired desktop app with progress bar built into a status bar, that will automatically get updated when any "Action" code gets executed. It leverages the Action API which is also pre-wired to run in a background thread.

By looking at that auto-generated code you'll be able to properly and easily implement it in your own.

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