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li = [0, 1, 2, 3]

running = True
while running:
    for elem in li:
        thiselem = elem
        nextelem = li[li.index(elem)+1]

When this reaches the last element, an IndexError is raised (as is the case for any list, tuple, dictionary, or string that is iterated). I actually want at that point for nextelem to equal li[0]. My rather cumbersome solution to this was

while running:
    for elem in li:
        thiselem = elem
        nextelem = li[li.index(elem)-len(li)+1]   # negative index

Is there a better way of doing this?

share|improve this question
    
Consider leaving out the while loop. It seems irrelevant to the question. If it is relevant, consider explaining why. –  Jason R. Coombs Jan 30 '10 at 13:36
    
I want to cycle through a list indefinitely, hence the while/for loop combination. Sorry, didn't explain that. –  ignoramus Jan 30 '10 at 13:50
    
I assume you would also, ideally, like to be able to stop in the middle of the cycle instead of just at the end? –  Omnifarious Jan 30 '10 at 13:55
    
Yes. I'm sure I could use break for that. –  ignoramus Jan 30 '10 at 14:45

5 Answers 5

up vote 17 down vote accepted

After thinking this through carefully, I think this is the best way. It lets you step off in the middle easily without using break, which I think is important, and it requires minimal computation, so I think it's the fastest. It also doesn't require that li be a list or tuple. It could be any iterator.

from itertools import cycle

li = [0, 1, 2, 3]

running = True
licycle = cycle(li)
# Prime the pump
nextelem = licycle.next()
while running:
    thiselem, nextelem = nextelem, licycle.next()

I'm leaving the other solutions here for posterity.

All of that fancy iterator stuff has its place, but not here. Use the % operator.

li = [0, 1, 2, 3]

running = True
while running:
    for idx, elem in enumerate(li):
        thiselem = elem
        nextelem = li[(idx + 1) % len(li)]

Now, if you intend to infinitely cycle through a list, then just do this:

li = [0, 1, 2, 3]

running = True
idx = 0
while running:
    thiselem = li[idx]
    idx = (idx + 1) % len(li)
    nextelem = li[idx]

I think that's easier to understand than the other solution involving tee, and probably faster too. If you're sure the list won't change size, you can squirrel away a copy of len(li) and use that.

This also lets you easily step off the ferris wheel in the middle instead of having to wait for the bucket to come down to the bottom again. The other solutions (including yours) require you check running in the middle of the for loop and then break.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Yeah, this is also simple and effective. There's no need for these unnecessarily complex functional solutions to problems which have extremely simple procedural solutions. Python is not a functional language! –  Mark Byers Jan 30 '10 at 13:37
    
@Mark Byers, thanks! I do think there's room for a fairly functional solution if the list is fairly small, and I added that. The whole bit with running is not functional, and trying to shoehorn it into a functional solution is ugly. –  Omnifarious Jan 30 '10 at 13:53
    
@Mark Byers: There, the answer I think is best uses itertools, but in a very minimalistic kind of way. I think its very fast, and easy to understand. –  Omnifarious Jan 30 '10 at 14:13
    
I'm such a perfectionist. It's irritating that after 8 edits it becomes a community wiki answer. sigh –  Omnifarious Jan 30 '10 at 14:25
    
Aw, that sucks. But thanks for the effort! I think your three solutions are my favourite. –  ignoramus Jan 31 '10 at 8:08

You can use a pairwise cyclic iterator:

from itertools import izip, cycle, tee

def pairwise(seq):
    a, b = tee(seq)
    next(b)
    return izip(a, b)

for elem, next_elem in pairwise(cycle(li)):
    ...
share|improve this answer
    
This is good. It incorporates the while loop and the for loop into one concise loop, which continuously iterates over adjacent pairs in the list, and wraps around at the end. –  Jason R. Coombs Jan 30 '10 at 13:37
    
+1 for using pairwise - an unofficial library function which exists only in the documentation for itertools. So while you can't import it, it's known to work. –  Jason R. Coombs Jan 30 '10 at 13:39
    
I think obscuring the test for running inside the for loop and requiring the use of break isn't such a good idea. –  Omnifarious Jan 30 '10 at 13:45
while running:
    for elem,next_elem in zip(li, li[1:]+[li[0]]):
        ...
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Simple is sometimes best. –  Mark Byers Jan 30 '10 at 13:26
    
This is my second favorite, after mine. :-) Simple is best, but if the list is at all large, this creates two copies of it. –  Omnifarious Jan 30 '10 at 13:34
while running:
    lenli = len(li)
    for i, elem in enumerate(li):
        thiselem = elem
        nextelem = li[(i+1)%lenli]
share|improve this answer

A rather different way to solve this:

   li = [0,1,2,3]

   for i in range(len(li)):

       if i < len(li)-1:

           # until end is reached
           print 'this', li[i]
           print 'next', li[i+1]

       else:

           # end
           print 'this', li[i]
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