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My understanding is that when using Permissions: sandbox Java applets in web-pages cannot access the file-system at all (although applets run through JNLP can) (source).

I am working on a game implemented as a Java applet and it would be fine to run sandboxed except we want to be able to save logs on the client system. Is there a way to do this from a sandboxed applet?

We use java.util.logging.Logger to obtain Logger instances, and Log4j is used by a 3rd-party library.

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Sign the app and ask the user to approve it for writing to their disk. (Personally, I'd be somewhat annoyed if an applet wrote anything locally except when I have explicitly asked it to do so.) –  keshlam Feb 10 at 15:35
    
That's precisely the point - is logging something Java can do on my behalf as a system function, without me needing to write on your local system explicitly? By running an applet, you allow Java to download whatever resources the applet needs so a sandboxed applet is still putting files on your system somewhere. –  Mr. Boy Feb 10 at 16:01
    
"By running an applet, you allow Java to download whatever resources the applet needs so a sandboxed applet is still putting files on your system somewhere." True, but that is only the resources it needs to run, and the download is under the control of the Java Virtual Machine. That is not the same as the applet code itself once running, which cannot write to the local file system (unless trusted, or using the JNLP file services). –  Andrew Thompson Feb 11 at 3:08
    
BTW - most logging is done using a named logger. A sand-boxed applet can establish an anonymous logger, but not a named logger. –  Andrew Thompson Feb 11 at 3:09

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