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I wanted to instantiate a trait and override a protected function g, making it accessible (function f is for testing).

trait A {
    protected def g( i: Int ) = println( i )
    def f( i: Int ) = println( i )
}

I created an object a1

val a1= new A {
    override def f( i: Int ) = super.f(i)
    override def g( i: Int ) = super.g(i)
    def h( i: Int ) = super.g(i)
}

and tried to call the methods

a1.f(1)
a1.g(3)    // this call fails
a1.h(5)

For a1.g(3) I get this error:

<console>:10: error: method g in trait A cannot be accessed in A{def h(i: Int): Unit}
   Access to protected method g not permitted because
   enclosing object $iw is not a subclass of 
   trait A where target is defined
                      a1.g(3)    // this call fails

But when I define a trait A2 extending A and overriding the methods f and g, create an instance of it and call the methods, all works fine

trait A2 extends A {
    override def f( i: Int ) = super.f(i)
    override def g( i: Int ) = super.g(i)
    def h( i: Int ) = super.g(i)
}
val a2= new A2 {}

a2.f(2)
a2.g(4)
a2.h(6)

Why is there a difference between

val a1= new A {
    override def g( i: Int ) = super.g(i)
}

and

trait A2 extends A {
    override def g( i: Int ) = super.g(i)
}
val a2= new A2 {}

?

Thanks!

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Short answer: It's a bug. issues.scala-lang.org/browse/SI-1352 –  Ian McLaird Feb 10 at 16:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In Java protected member is accessible to both subclasses and the package in which the member is defined, in Scala, on the other hand, member is visible only to subclasses.

In your case, the code is probably called from outside of a class implementing A (e.g. from worksheet)

If you want to simulate Java behavior, then you can use notation

protected[package_name] def g(i: Int) = println(i)

then, the method g() will be visible inside the package package_name

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My intent was to make a protected method accessible by overriding it - whether this makes sense or not - I have to think aubout it –  user3293103 Feb 11 at 8:24

You don't have to play games with override just for testing. You can do something like this:

package com.foo.bar

trait MyTrait{
  def stuff(i: Int) = hidden(i) + 1

  protected[bar] hidden(i: Int): Int
}

and then in the test file

package com.foo.bar

class Testing extends Specification{
  "hidden" must{
    //some tests in here
   }

which is another way of saying, "hidden is visible at the package level and thus anything within that package can see/test it."

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Thanks for the hint, I will try it. I'm new to scala and when I encounter a problem, I write some simple lines of code. Originally I wanted to override publish from scala.collection.mutable.Publisher –  user3293103 Feb 11 at 8:17

I'll just go ahead and make my comment an answer. It's a bug. It really should work the way you expect, but it doesn't.

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