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I'm currently using the following code to right-trim all the std::strings in my programs:

std::string s;
s.erase(s.find_last_not_of(" \n\r\t")+1);

It works fine, but I wonder if there are some end-cases where it might fail?

Of course, answers with elegant alternatives and also left-trim solution are welcome.

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155  
The answers to this question are a testament to how lacking the C++ standard library is. –  Idan K Aug 24 '10 at 18:15
16  
@IdanK And it still doesn't have this function in C++11. –  xiaomao Mar 10 '12 at 18:10
9  
@IdanK: Great, isn't it! Look at all the competing options we now have at our disposal, unencumbered by a single person's idea of "the way that we must do it"! –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 30 '13 at 1:40
3  
@MooingDuck: A choice of types is one thing; a choice of functionality within a given type is another, since providing those choices can create limitations on the rest of the type and on its implementation. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 27 '13 at 1:14
4  
@LightnessRacesinOrbit functionality within a type, well that's a design decision, and adding a trim function to a string might (at least under c++) not be the best solution anyway - but not providing any standard way to do it, instead letting everyone fret over the same such small issues over and over again, is certainly not helping anyone either –  RandolphCarter Mar 29 '13 at 11:01
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22 Answers

I tend to use one of these 3 for my trimming needs:

#include <algorithm> 
#include <functional> 
#include <cctype>
#include <locale>

// trim from start
static inline std::string &ltrim(std::string &s) {
        s.erase(s.begin(), std::find_if(s.begin(), s.end(), std::not1(std::ptr_fun<int, int>(std::isspace))));
        return s;
}

// trim from end
static inline std::string &rtrim(std::string &s) {
        s.erase(std::find_if(s.rbegin(), s.rend(), std::not1(std::ptr_fun<int, int>(std::isspace))).base(), s.end());
        return s;
}

// trim from both ends
static inline std::string &trim(std::string &s) {
        return ltrim(rtrim(s));
}

They are fairly self explanatory and work very well.

EDIT: btw, I have std::ptr_fun in there to help disambiguate std::isspace because there is actually a second definition which supports locales. This could have been a cast just the same, but I tend to like this better.

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10  
Just for completeness, I had to add these headers in order to make these great functions compile: #include <algorithm> #include <functional> #include <locale> –  Juan Calero Dec 16 '10 at 16:00
3  
Unfortunately, it does not compile on Visual Studio 2008 –  Luca Martini May 25 '12 at 9:23
3  
@LucaMartini: add #include <cctype> and it'll compile just fine. I'll update the answer above. –  Evan Teran May 25 '12 at 20:02
1  
Also, need to move trim to below both rtrim and ltrim. –  Evan Teran May 25 '12 at 20:03
4  
This code was failing on some international strings (shift-jis in my case, stored in a std::string); I ended up using boost::trim to solve the problem. –  Tom Jul 22 '12 at 4:36
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Using Boost's string algorithms would be easiest

#include <boost/algorithm/string.hpp>
using namespace std;
using namespace boost::algorithm;

string str1(" hello world! ");
trim(str1);

// str1 is now "hello world!"
// Use trim_right() if only trailing whitespace is to be removed.
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4  
It depends on the locale. My default locale (VS2005, en) means tabs, spaces, carriage returns, newlines, vertical tabs and form feeds are trimmed. –  MattyT Jan 26 '09 at 13:11
27  
Boost is such a massive hammer for such a tiny problem. –  rodarmor Mar 27 '12 at 4:44
45  
@rodarmor: Boost solves many tiny problems. It's a massive hammer that solves a lot. –  Nicol Bolas May 25 '12 at 20:22
19  
Boost is a set of hammers of many different sizes solving many different problems. –  Ibrahim Jan 18 '13 at 11:14
4  
The trim() of this answer trims leading and trailing whitespace, but the question is for only trailing, so use trim_right() for that behavior. –  WilliamKF Mar 28 '13 at 19:58
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I like tzaman's solution, the only problem with it is that it doesn't trim a string containing only spaces.

To correct that 1 flaw, add a str.clear() in between the 2 trimmer lines

std::stringstream trimmer;
trimmer << str;
str.clear();
trimmer >> str;
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1  
+1: Good point. –  ereOn Jul 5 '10 at 6:51
    
Nice :) the problem with both our solutions, though, is that they'll trim both ends; can't make an ltrim or rtrim like this. –  tzaman Jul 7 '10 at 8:12
17  
Good, but can't deal with string with internal whitespace. e.g. trim( abc def") -> abc, only abc left. –  liheyuan Sep 22 '11 at 3:15
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I've been using the following code to right trim spaces and tab characters from std::strings:

// trim trailing spaces
size_t endpos = str.find_last_not_of(" \t");
if( string::npos != endpos )
{
    str = str.substr( 0, endpos+1 );
}

And just to balance things out, I'll include the left trim code too.

// trim leading spaces
size_t startpos = str.find_first_not_of(" \t");
if( string::npos != startpos )
{
    str = str.substr( startpos );
}
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This won't detect other forms of whitespace... newline, line feed, carriage return in particular. –  Tom Dec 7 '08 at 21:23
    
Right. You have to customize it for the whitespace you're looking to trim. My particular application was only expecting spaces and tabs, but you can add \n\r to catch the others. –  Bill the Lizard Dec 8 '08 at 0:20
4  
str.substr(...).swap(str) is better. Save an assignment. –  updogliu Aug 30 '12 at 8:55
2  
@updogliu Won't it use move assignment basic_string& operator= (basic_string&& str) noexcept; ? –  nurettin Oct 8 '13 at 8:47
    
This answer does not alter strings that are ALL spaces. Which is a fail. –  Tom Andersen Apr 9 at 22:19
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In the case of an empty string, your code assumes that adding 1 to string::npos gives 0. string::npos is of type string::size_type, which is unsigned. Thus, you are relying on the overflow behaviour of addition.

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8  
You're phrasing that as if it's bad. Signed integer overflow behavior is bad. –  MSalters Oct 20 '08 at 8:21
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Hacked off of Cplusplus.com

string choppa(const string &t, const string &ws)
{
    string str = t;
    size_t found;
    found = str.find_last_not_of(ws);
    if (found != string::npos)
    	str.erase(found+1);
    else
    	str.clear();            // str is all whitespace

    return str;
}

This works for the null case as well. :-)

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This is just rtrim, not ltrim –  ub3rst4r Mar 14 at 7:05
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Try this, it works for me.

inline std::string trim(std::string& str)
{
str.erase(0, str.find_first_not_of(' '));       //prefixing spaces
str.erase(str.find_last_not_of(' ')+1);         //surfixing spaces
return str;
}
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3  
If your string contains no suffixing spaces, this will erase starting at npos+1 == 0, and you will delete the entire string. –  rgove Oct 17 '12 at 3:51
    
@rgove Please explain. str.find_last_not_of(x) returns the position of the first character not equal to x. It only returns npos if no chars do not match x. In the example, if there are no suffixing spaces, it will return the equivalent of str.length() - 1, yielding essentially str.erase((str.length() - 1) + 1). That is, unless I am terribly mistaken. –  Travis Oct 30 '13 at 14:46
    
@Travis: Looks like you're right. Apologies to the answerer. –  rgove Oct 30 '13 at 18:11
    
This fails for all-whitespace strings. (Adding an if not empty before the second 'erase()' fixes this.) Also return the modified value and modifying the argument passed by reference is probably misleading when reading code using the return value. –  Johannes Overmann Jan 10 at 9:50
    
@JohannesOvermann: Why should it fail for all-whitespace strings? –  robert Jan 22 at 11:42
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@tzaman and @Schoonbrood: Be careful when using the >> operator from a stringstream to a string as it the intention of trimming might end in cutting the string.

Example:

string tm("\nHello  you   \tthere \n ");
stringstream mt;
mt << tm;
tm.clear();
mt >> tm;
cout << "size " << tm.size() << tm << "\n";

The output will be

size 5Hello

Regards, G.

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My solution based on the answer by @Bill the Lizard.

Note that these functions will return the empty string if the input string contains nothing but whitespace.

const std::string StringUtils::WHITESPACE = " \n\r\t";

std::string StringUtils::Trim(const std::string& s)
{
    return TrimRight(TrimLeft(s));
}

std::string StringUtils::TrimLeft(const std::string& s)
{
    size_t startpos = s.find_first_not_of(StringUtils::WHITESPACE);
    return (startpos == std::string::npos) ? "" : s.substr(startpos);
}

std::string StringUtils::TrimRight(const std::string& s)
{
    size_t endpos = s.find_last_not_of(StringUtils::WHITESPACE);
    return (endpos == std::string::npos) ? "" : s.substr(0, endpos+1);
}
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I'm not sure if your environment is the same, but in mine, the empty string case will cause the program to abort. I would either wrap that erase call with an if(!s.empty()) or use Boost as already mentioned.

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Bit late to the party, but never mind. Now C++11 is here, we have lambdas and auto variables. So my version, which also handles all-whitespace and empty strings, is:

#include <cctype>
#include <string>
#include <algorithm>

inline std::string trim(const std::string &s)
{
   auto wsfront=std::find_if_not(s.begin(),s.end(),[](int c){return std::isspace(c);});
   auto wsback=std::find_if_not(s.rbegin(),s.rend(),[](int c){return std::isspace(c);}).base();
   return (wsback<=wsfront ? std::string() : std::string(wsfront,wsback));
}

We could make a reverse iterator from wsfront and use that as the termination condition in the second find_if_not but that's only useful in the case of an all-whitespace string, and gcc 4.8 at least isn't smart enough to infer the type of the reverse iterator (std::string::const_reverse_iterator) with auto. I don't know how expensive constructing a reverse iterator is, so YMMV here. With this alteration, the code looks like this:

inline std::string trim(const std::string &s)
{
   auto  wsfront=std::find_if_not(s.begin(),s.end(),[](int c){return std::isspace(c);});
   return std::string(wsfront,std::find_if_not(s.rbegin(),std::string::const_reverse_iterator(wsfront),[](int c){return std::isspace(c);}).base());
}
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Nice. +1 from me. Too bad C++11 did not introduce trim() into std::string and made life easier for everyone. –  Milan Babuškov Jul 31 '13 at 17:41
    
I always want one function call to trim string, instead of implementing it –  linquize Jan 17 at 8:56
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The above methods are great, but sometimes you want to use a combination of functions for what your routine considers to be whitespace. In this case, using functors to combine operations can get messy so I prefer a simple loop I can modify for the trim. Here is a slightly modified trim function copied from the C version here on SO. In this example, I am trimming non alphanumeric characters.

string trim(char const *str)
{
  // Trim leading non-letters
  while(!isalnum(*str)) str++;

  // Trim trailing non-letters
  end = str + strlen(str) - 1;
  while(end > str && !isalnum(*end)) end--;

  return string(str, end+1);
}
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Here's what I came up with:

std::stringstream trimmer;
trimmer << str;
trimmer >> str;

Stream extraction eliminates whitespace automatically, so this works like a charm.
Pretty clean and elegant too, if I do say so myself. ;)

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7  
Hmm; this assumes that the string has no internal whitespace (e.g. spaces). The OP only said he wanted to trim whitespace on the left or right. –  SuperElectric Nov 9 '10 at 20:33
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This version trims internal whitespace and non-alphanumerics:

static inline std::string &trimAll(std::string &s)
{   
    if(s.size() == 0)
    {
        return s;
    }

    int val = 0;
    for (int cur = 0; cur < s.size(); cur++)
    {
        if(s[cur] != ' ' && std::isalnum(s[cur]))
        {
            s[val] = s[cur];
            val++;
        }
    }
    s.resize(val);
    return s;
}
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Yet another option - removes one or more characters from both ends.

string strip(const string& s, const string& chars=" ") {
    size_t begin = 0;
    size_t end = s.size()-1;
    for(; begin < s.size(); begin++)
        if(chars.find_first_of(s[begin]) == string::npos)
            break;
    for(; end > begin; end--)
        if(chars.find_first_of(s[end]) == string::npos)
            break;
    return s.substr(begin, end-begin+1);
}
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What about this...?

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <regex>

std::string ltrim( std::string str ) {
    return std::regex_replace( str, std::regex("^\\s+"), std::string("") );
}

std::string rtrim( std::string str ) {
    return std::regex_replace( str, std::regex("\\s+$"), std::string("") );
}

std::string trim( std::string str ) {
    return ltrim( rtrim( str ) );
}

int main() {

    std::string str = "   \t  this is a test string  \n   ";
    std::cout << "-" << trim( str ) << "-\n";
    return 0;

}

Note: I'm still relatively new to C++, so please forgive me if I'm off base here.

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2  
Using regex for trimming is a bit of an overkill. –  user1095108 Oct 3 '13 at 20:17
1  
Is it much more CPU intensive than some of the other options presented? –  Duncan Oct 3 '13 at 20:24
1  
Sure, but just to be sure profile it yourself. –  user1095108 Oct 3 '13 at 20:27
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This is what I use. Just keep removing space from the front, and then, if there's anything left, do the same from the back.

void trim(string& s) {
    while(s.compare(0,1," ")==0)
        s.erase(s.begin()); // remove leading whitespaces
    while(s.size()>0 && s.compare(s.size()-1,1," ")==0)
        s.erase(s.end()-1); // remove trailing whitespaces
}
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I guess if you start asking for the "best way" to trim a string, I'd say a good implementation would be one that:

  1. Doesn't allocate temporary strings
  2. Has overloads for in-place trim and copy trim
  3. Can be easily customized to accept different validation sequences / logic

Obviously there are too many different ways to approach this and it definitely depends on what you actually need. However, the C standard library still has some very useful functions in <string.h>, like memchr. There's a reason why C is still regarded as the best language for IO - its stdlib is pure efficiency.

inline const char* trim_start(const char* str)
{
    while (memchr(" \t\n\r", *str, 4))  ++str;
    return str;
}
inline const char* trim_end(const char* end)
{
    while (memchr(" \t\n\r", end[-1], 4)) --end;
    return end;
}
inline std::string trim(const char* buffer, int len) // trim a buffer (input?)
{
    return std::string(trim_start(buffer), trim_end(buffer + len));
}
inline void trim_inplace(std::string& str)
{
    str.assign(trim_start(str.c_str()),
        trim_end(str.c_str() + str.length()));
}

int main()
{
    char str [] = "\t \nhello\r \t \n";

    string trimmed = trim(str, strlen(str));
    cout << "'" << trimmed << "'" << endl;

    system("pause");
    return 0;
}
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http://ideone.com/nFVtEo

std::string trim(const std::string &s)
{
    std::string::const_iterator it = s.begin();
    while (it != s.end() && isspace(*it))
        it++;

    std::string::const_reverse_iterator rit = s.rbegin();
    while (rit.base() != it && isspace(*rit))
        rit++;

    return std::string(it, rit.base());
}
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With C++11 also came a regular expression module, which of course can be used to trim leading or trailing spaces.

Maybe something like this:

std::string ltrim(const std::string& s)
{
    static const std::regex lws{"^[[:space:]]*", std::regex_constants::extended};
    return std::regex_replace(s, lws, "");
}

std::string rtrim(const std::string& s)
{
    static const std::regex tws{"[[:space:]]*$", std::regex_constants::extended};
    return std::regex_replace(s, tws, "");
}

std::string trim(const std::string& s)
{
    return ltrim(rtrim(s));
}
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std::string trim( std::string && str )
{
    size_t end = str.find_last_not_of( " \n\r\t" );
    if ( end != std::string::npos )
        str.resize( end + 1 );

    size_t start = str.find_first_not_of( " \n\r\t" );
    if ( start != std::string::npos )
        str = str.substr( start );

    return std::move( str );
}
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This any good? (Cause this post totally needs another answer :)

string trimBegin(string str)
{
    string whites = "\t\r\n ";
    int i = 0;
    while (whites.find(str[i++]) != whites::npos);
    str.erase(0, i);
    return str;
}

Similar case for the trimEnd, just reverse the polari- er, indices.

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protected by Evan Mulawski Jun 24 '12 at 20:33

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