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Here is my attempt

var extend = function(base, sub) {
    sub.prototype = Object.create(base.prototype);
    sub.prototype.constructor = sub;
};

MyArray = function() {
    Array.call(this, arguments);
};

extend(Array, MyArray);

var arr = new MyArray();

arr.push(1);
arr.push(2);
arr.push(3);

console.log(arr);

for (var i in arr) {
    if (arr.hasOwnProperty(i)) {
        console.log(i + " => " + arr[i]);
    }
}

And the output it is generating (running this in node)

{ '0': 1, '1': 2, '2': 3, length: 3 }
0 => 1
1 => 2
2 => 3
length => 3

I assume by calling Array.call(this, arguments)

I would be passing off the construction of the object to the native constructor, which should handle the length as not enumerable.

When switching to new Array() it generates the following output.

[ 1, 2, 3 ]
0 => 1
1 => 2
2 => 3

The general question is why the differences in the resulting object, and more specifically, why is the length property made enumerable?

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Extending the native Array is troublesome. If you could perhaps encapsulate an array in your MyArray class, it would be a lot easier. –  Tibos Feb 10 '14 at 16:27
1  
Sure, this is a slightly academic question to define what "troubleshome" means. –  jondavidjohn Feb 10 '14 at 16:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I assume by calling Array.call(this, arguments) I would be passing off the construction of the object to the native constructor, which should handle the length as not enumerable.

No. EcmaScript 5 does not allow to subclass Array - in a controlled environment like node you can only use the var arr=[]; arr.__proto__=mycustomprototype; hack.

Array.call(this) unfortunately does not work. It returns a new array, which is assigned to nothing, but it does not do anything on this. You can check by this !== Array.call(this).

So how did you get a length property on your custom object? push did create it. It saw the inherited Array.prototype.length property (0), so after inserting the number it did assign arr.length = 1 which created an enumerable property.

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Quality link, and thanks for explaining. –  jondavidjohn Feb 10 '14 at 16:42

In general it is a good practice to avoid inheriting from standard classes. The reason for that is that there are some properties such as length, for example, that operate specially on objects that are marked internally as true arrays.

Objects created using the Array constructor or the array literal expression have that internal property set to "Array". Instances of the Array subclass have the the value of "Object" for the [[Class]] property. Try the following

Object.prototype.toString.call(arr); // "[object Object]"

whereas

Object.prototype.toString.call([]); // "[object Array]"

That means that some of the Array properties are going to lose their default behavior.

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